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Adaptivity as a Transformative Disposition of Schools for Student Learning in the Twenty-First Century

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Part of the Education Innovation Series book series (EDIN)

Abstract

The research reported in this chapter builds on work commenced 8 years ago with reviewing the literature and models of successful school leadership for improved student outcomes. When the findings of this review were combined with the results from case studies of successful schools, it resulted in a preliminary model of successful school principalship. My research team and I examined a range of areas using further analysis of the case study data, detailed analysis of the subsequent quantitative surveys (developed in part from the preliminary model), and student literacy, numeracy, and social development results. The final part the research used model building and powerful multi-level statistical analyses of the survey data. For those seeking successful and constantly improving schools the concluded challenge is to create synergistic effects; the accumulation of a number of effects developed with others over time in the same direction. But success also depends on which areas of school life the school chooses to focus time and attention. As we clearly demonstrate in our research, success will be most likely if the school choose areas they can actually influence – areas such as school capacity building, evaluation and accountability, teacher values and beliefs, and student social development.

Keywords

Capacity Building Student Outcome Hierarchical Linear Modeling Preliminary Model Successful School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of TasmaniaSandy BayAustralia

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