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The “East Asian Miracle” Economies, Inequalities and Schooling

  • Marilyn Kell
  • Peter Kell
Chapter
  • 523 Downloads
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 24)

Abstract

The post-war era has witnessed the phenomena of Asian boom economies and the growth of what has been termed “Asian Tiger” economies. This chapter looks critically at the consequence of the Asian economic miracle and inequalities that have typified many of the countries in the region. The chapter identifies inequalities in access to education and schooling that have been influenced by geography (with advantages to those in proximity to cities), the ability to speak the language of instruction and ethnicity. The chapter utilises data from the Human Development Index and a number of United Nations international research surveys of young people to explore their lives and opportunities. The chapter concludes with a critique of the impact of education, economic inequality and urban environments on the lives and wellbeing of many children and young people in East Asia.

Keywords

Young People Human Development Index Global Financial Crisis Gross National Income Global City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Kell, P. M., & Vogl, G. (2007). Internationalisation, national development and markets: Key dilemmas for leadership in higher education in Australia. In P. M. Kell & G. Vogl (Eds.), Higher education in the Asia Pacific: Challenges of the future (pp. 12–29). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
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  3. Mukhopadhaya, P. (2002). Education policy as a means to tackle income disparity: The Singapore case. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 20(11/12), 59–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  8. UNICEF. (2009c). Opinion poll: What young people think; East Asia and the Pacific information, knowledge and life skills. www.unicef.org/polls/eapro/information/index.html. Accessed 26 Apr 2012.
  9. UNICEF. (2009d). Opinion poll: What young people think; East Asia and the Pacific Feelings of wellbeing and outlook on life. www.unicef.org/polls/eapro/information/index.htmlon. Accessed 26 Apr 2012.
  10. UNICEF. (2009e). Opinion poll: What young people think; East Asia and the Pacific participation, communication and influence on decisions affecting children. www.unicef.org/polls/eapro/participation/index.html. Accessed 26 Apr 2012.
  11. UNICEF. (2010). Regional overview: State of youth in Asia and the Pacific. Retrieved from http://social.un.org/youthyear/docs/ESCAPFinal5.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn Kell
    • 1
  • Peter Kell
    • 2
  1. 1.Charles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia

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