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The New Dynamic and Shifting Approaches Literacy and Language in East Asia

  • Marilyn Kell
  • Peter Kell
Chapter
  • 525 Downloads
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 24)

Abstract

This chapter provides some conclusions and recommendations using a framework for interpretation based on the need to changing approaches to literacy to respond to the dynamic environment that confronts schooling and learning. In seeking approaches the discussion includes further critiques on standardised testing and examinations and the need to explore new models to sustain the a higher quality of teaching and learning that engages students more holistically. The chapter calls for opportunities for students to experience the new approaches that integrate work and learning. In looking for future directions this chapter documents developments in Finland, also a country ranking high in student achievement tests, for ways promoting national education reform without a dominance of examinations. The chapter also and calls for changes to the quality of life and the environment on Asia, as well as the lives of young people. This includes reforms that facilitate more equitable living conditions and opportunities democratic and inclusive approaches to learning and education as well as reforms in the broader society.

Keywords

Young People Vocational Education Language Policy Asian Nation Shadow Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn Kell
    • 1
  • Peter Kell
    • 2
  1. 1.Charles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia

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