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Overlooking the Scene: Electronic Music and Toronto’s Music City Project (1999–2019)

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Abstract

Numerous Toronto music venues led the way to an electronic music scene that became more permanently housed within music venues and provided space for intercultural unity and musical innovation. These spaces served as entry points for a generation of electronic music lovers, who later then experienced the loss of those same venues. During the 2000s, the scene ran up against city policies intended to suppress its development, notably the so-called Rave Ban. Culture-led redevelopment policies now see Toronto curating a desire to achieve UNESCO “Music City” status. Recent policy changes influenced by the work of Toronto’s Music Advisory Council, like its revised noise bylaw and incorporation of the Agent of Change principle, carry the potential to shape the future sustainability of Toronto’s electronic music scene(s).

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Bill 73, the ‘Raves Act’, defined raves as “an event with all of the following attributes”:

    1. 1.

      Any part of the event occurs between 2 a.m. and 6:00 a.m.

    2. 2.

      People must pay money or give some other consideration to participate in the event.

    3. 3.

      The primary activity at the event is dancing by the participants.

    4. 4.

      The event does not take place in a private dwelling.

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Correspondence to Sara Ross .

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© 2021 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

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Ross, S. (2021). Overlooking the Scene: Electronic Music and Toronto’s Music City Project (1999–2019). In: Darchen, S., Charrieras, D., Willsteed, J. (eds) Electronic Cities. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-33-4741-0_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-33-4741-0_6

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  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-33-4740-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-33-4741-0

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)

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