Skip to main content

Assessment of Ethical Understanding—Tools, Techniques and Strategies

  • 377 Accesses

Abstract

It is being said that ‘ethics’ cannot be taught; therefore, the question of assessing its understanding also stands redundant. But ethical understanding is often reflected through different activities and behaviours in the daily lives of the people. This chapter focuses upon the different ways in which a teacher can assess a student’s ethical understanding with respect to the ethical issues in the most implicit way. It involves both formative and summative assessment criteria and can be individualized as well, depending on the need and level of the learners. The aim is not only to assess the students’ ethical understanding but more so to develop it to higher levels of thought, application and reasoning. The chapter contains some tools and techniques, such as worksheets, learning log, group activities, projects and e-portfolios that could assist the teachers in planning their assessment strategies and also enable our young learners in their self-assessment.

Keywords

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD   84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Learn about institutional subscriptions

Notes

  1. 1.

    In the present chapter, the terms ‘Assessment’ and ‘Evaluation’ are used where ‘assessment’ refers to a classroom research that informs the process of teaching and learning. ‘Evaluation’ is solely carried out for the purpose of grading and reporting of student progress.

  2. 2.

    Source: www.australiancurriculum.edu.au.

References

  • All, A. C., Huycke, L. I., & Fisher, M. J. (2003). Instructional tools for nursing education: Concept maps. Nursing Education Perspectives, 24, 311–317.

    Google Scholar 

  • Balogh, D. W. (2002). Teaching tips-teaching ethics across the psychology curriculum. Retrieved from Association for Psychological Science: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/teaching/tips/tips_0902.cfm.

  • Barrie, S. (2006). Understanding what we mean by the generic attributes of graduates. Higher Education, 51(2), 215–241.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Black, P. (2016). The role of assessment in pedagogy—And why validity matters. In D. Wyse, L. Hayward, & J. Pandya (Eds.), The Sage handbook of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (pp. 725–739). London: Sage Reference.

    Google Scholar 

  • Budd, J. W. (2004). Mind maps as classroom exercises. Journal of Economic Education, 35–46.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Cameron, M. (2012). ‘Economics with training wheels’: Using blogs in teaching and assessing introductory economics. The Journal of Economic Education, 43(4), 397–407. https://doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2012.714316.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Davies, E. (1995). Reflective practice: A focus for caring. Journal of Nursing Education, 34, 167–174.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eden, C. (2004). Analyzing cognitive maps to help structure issues or problems. European Journal of Operational Research, 159, 673–686.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Holmes, V. (1997). Grading journals in clinical practice: A delicate issue. Journal of Nursing Education, 36, 489–492.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jackling, B., Natoli, R., Siddique, S., & Sciulli, N. (2015). Student attitudes to blogs: A case study of reflective and collaborative learning. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 40(4), 542–556. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2014.931926.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jones, M., van Kessel, G., Swisher, L., Beckstead, J., & Edwards, I. (2014). Cognitive maps and the structure of observed learning outcome assessment of physiotherapy students’ ethical reasoning knowledge. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2013.772951.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kabasenche, W. P. (2014). [The ethics of] Teaching science and ethics: A collaborative proposal. Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education, 135–138.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kinchin, I. M., & Hay, D. B. (2000). How a qualitative approach to concept map analysis can be used to aid learning by illustrating patterns of conceptual development. Educational Research, 42, 43–57.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kohlberg, L. (1958). The development of modes of moral thinking and choice in the years 10 to 16 (1st ed.). Ph.D. Thesis, University of Chicago.

    Google Scholar 

  • Matchett, N. J. (2008). Ethics across the curriculum. In S. L. Moore (Ed.), New directions for higher education—Practical approaches to ethics for colleges and universities (pp. 25–38). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • McCagg, E., & Dansereau, D. (1991). A convergent paradigm for examining knowledge mapping as a learning strategy. Journal of Educational Research, 84, 317–324.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • McIntosh, M., & Draper, R. J. (2001). Using learning logs in mathematics—Writing to learn. Mathematics Teacher, 94, 554–557.

    Google Scholar 

  • Novak, J. D. (1990). Concept maps and Vee diagrams: Two metacognitive tools to facilitate meaningful learning. Instructional Science, 19, 29–52.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Novak, J. D. (1995). Concept mapping to facilitate teaching and learning. Prospects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 93, 79–86.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • O’Neill, K., Sing, G., & O’Donoghue, J. (2004). Implementing e-learning programmes for higher education: A review of the literature. Journal of Information Technology Education, 3, 313–323.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Perritt Lee, E. (1997). The learning response log—An assessment tool. The English Journal, 86(1), 41–44.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. (1936). Origins of intelligence in the child. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pinch, S., Sunley, P., & Macmillen, J. (2010). Cognitive mapping of creative practice: A case study of three English design agencies. Geoforum, 41, 377–387.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • QAA. (2002). Benchmarking academic standards: The biosciences. Quality Assurance Agency.

    Google Scholar 

  • Resnik, D. B. (1998). The ethics of science—An introduction. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rest, J. (1986). Moral development. New York: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schon, D. (1983). The reflective practitioner. London: Temple Smith.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, K. (2016). Assessment for learning: A pedagogical tool. In W. Dominic, L. Hayward, & J. Pandya (Eds.), The Sage handbook of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (pp. 740–755). London: Sage reference.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swisher, L. L. (2007). The problem of measurement in ethics education. In Symposium: Educating for Moral Action: Creating a Global Dialogue. World Confederation for Physical Therapy, Vancouver, Canada.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tyler, R. W. (1949). Basic principles of curriculum and instruction. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). In M. Cole (Ed.), Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Walker, S. E. (2006). Journal writing as a teaching technique to promote reflection. Journal of Athletic Training, 41(2), 216–221. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1472640/pdf/i1062-6050-41-2-216.pdf.

  • Wilmut, I., Schnieke, A., McWhir, J., Kind, A., & Campbell, K. (1997). Viable offspring derived from fetal and adult mammalian cells [letter]. Nature, 769–771.

    Google Scholar 

Websites

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Astha Saxena .

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2019 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Saxena, A. (2019). Assessment of Ethical Understanding—Tools, Techniques and Strategies. In: Ethics in Science. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-32-9009-9_11

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-32-9009-9_11

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-32-9008-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-32-9009-9

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics