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SCALE: A Competence Analytics Framework

  • David BoulangerEmail author
  • Jérémie Seanosky
  • Colin Pinnell
  • Jason Bell
  • Vivekanandan Kumar
  • Kinshuk
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Educational Technology book series (LNET)

Abstract

This paper introduces SCALE, a Smart Competence Analytics engine on LEarning, as a framework to implement content analysis in several learning domains and provide mechanisms to define proficiency and confidence metrics. SCALE’s ontological design plays a crucial role in centralizing and homogenizing disparate data from domain-specific parsers and ultimately from several learning domains. This paper shows how SCALE has been applied in the programming domain and reveals systematically how the work content of a student can be analyzed and converted to evidences to assess his/her proficiency in domain-specific competences and how SCALE can also analyze the student’s interaction with a learning activity and provide a confidence metric to assess his/her behavior as he/she culminates toward goal achievements.

Keywords

SCALE Competence Proficiency Confidence Learning analytics Ontological design 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Boulanger
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jérémie Seanosky
    • 1
  • Colin Pinnell
    • 1
  • Jason Bell
    • 1
  • Vivekanandan Kumar
    • 1
  • Kinshuk
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computing and Information SystemsAthabasca UniversityAthabascaCanada

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