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Part of the book series: Creativity in the Twenty First Century ((CTFC))

Abstract

Since Wallas (1926), the description of the stages of the creative process concerned creativity in general, including art, science, design or music. But what about differences in the creative process between different fields of endeavor? The objectives of this chapter are to describe creative processes respecting an ecological approach by observing the process in its natural context. Analyses of the transitions between process stages, by domain and across domains, show specific patterns underlying creative work. In this chapter, a new vision of the creative process across fields is offered. Issues of process-related domain specificity are discussed.

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Correspondence to Marion Botella .

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Botella, M., Lubart, T. (2016). Creative Processes: Art, Design and Science. In: Corazza, G., Agnoli, S. (eds) Multidisciplinary Contributions to the Science of Creative Thinking. Creativity in the Twenty First Century. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-618-8_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-618-8_4

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  • Print ISBN: 978-981-287-617-1

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