Advertisement

Yumemai Floating Swing Arch Bridge of Osaka, Japan

  • E. WatanabeEmail author
  • T. Maruyama
  • S. Ueda
  • H. Tanaka
Chapter
Part of the Ocean Engineering & Oceanography book series (OEO, volume 3)

Abstract

The Yumemai Bridge is a floating swing arch bridge constructed across a water channel and supported by two hollow steel pontoons in the Port of Osaka. It connects two reclaimed islands to the regional road network and can swing around a pivot axis near one end of the girder with the assistance of a tug boat. The design of the bridge specifically addressed the action of waves, wind and earthquakes, the required swinging mechanism and the issue of durability. The pontoons are made corrosion-free with their side lined with titanium plates and with the other wet surface by cathodic protection. The mooring system consists of dolphins with movable reaction walls and rubber fenders. The reaction walls are located on the fixed dolphins with piles driven in the seabed. The structure is designed to be strong and stable enough to withstand typhoon-level winds and waves.

Keywords

Bridge Deck Wind Load Tsunami Height Hybrid Simulation Mooring System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Writers feel great honor and happy for their having been able to take part in the project of implementing the Yumemai Bridge project and fully appreciate the efforts and enthusiasm of all of the people who participated in the project of Yumemai Bridge, particularly the people from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, MLIT of the Government of Japan, Municipal Government of Osaka City, bridge and ship engineers of bridge and shipyard companies.

References

  1. JRA Specifications for Highway Bridges and Commentary. (1996). Part I Common design principles, Part II Steel bridges and Part V Seismic design. Maruzen (in Japanese). Google Scholar
  2. JRA Specifications for Highway Bridges and Commentary. (2012). Part I Common design principles, Part II Steel bridges and Part V Seismic design.Maruzen (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  3. JSCE. (2006). Guidelines for design of floating bridges. In E. Watanabe (Ed.), Steel structures series 13, floating bridges subcommittee, committee of steel structures. Tokyo: Japan Society of Civil Engineers, Maruzen.Google Scholar
  4. Kawatani, I., Maruyama, T., Kawamura, Y., & Kishimoto, T. (1997). Vibration serviceability of floating bridge. In Proceedings of Structural Engineering J.S.C.E. (Vol. 43A, pp. 757–764) (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  5. Kobayashi, M. et al. (1999). Model experiments on swinging of a movable floating bridge in waves. In Proceedings of VLFS’99 (pp. 546–554). Hawaii, USA.Google Scholar
  6. Maruyama, T., Ogawa, K., & Shimodoi, H. (1995). Wind-tunnel test for the Maishima–Yumeshima bridge. In Proceedings of Wind Engineering of J.S.C.E. (pp. 161–162).Google Scholar
  7. Maruyama, T., Watanabe, E., & Tanaka, H. (1998a). Floating swing bridge with a 280 m span, Osaka. Structural Engineering International, 8, 174–175.Google Scholar
  8. Maruyama, T. et al. (1998b). Planned design of Yumeshima-Maishima bridge (1)—movable floating bridge. Bridge and Foundation, 32(2), 15-24  (in Japanese). Google Scholar
  9. Maruyama, T. et al. (1998c). Plan and design of Yumeshima-Maishima bridge (2)—movable floating bridge. Bridge and Foundation, 32(3), 15-24 (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  10. Maruyama, T., Watanabe, E., Utsunomiya, T., & Tanaka, H. (1998d). A new movable arch bridge in Osaka Harbor. In Proceedings of the Sixth East Asia–Pacific Conference on Structural Engineering and Construction, EASEC6 (pp. 429–434). Taipei, Taiwan.Google Scholar
  11. Maruyama, T. et al. (2000). A study on the strength of floating bridge pontoon in small ship collision. In Proceedings of Structural Engineering J.S.C.E. (Vol. 46A) (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  12. Nagata, S. et al. (1999). Motions of a movable floating bridge in waves. In Proceedings of VLFS’99 (pp. 358–366). Hawaii, USA.Google Scholar
  13. Oda, K., Maruyama, T., Tanaka, H., Nagata, S., & Yamase, S. (1998). Hybrid simulation for a new movable floating bridge, In Proceedings of the Sixth East Asia-Pacific Conference on Structural Engineering and Construction, EASEC6 (pp. 435–440). Taipei, Taiwan.Google Scholar
  14. Ueda, S. et al. (1999). Experimental study on the elastic response of a movable floating bridge in waves. In Proceedings of VLFS’99 (pp. 766–775). Hawaii, USA.Google Scholar
  15. Utsunomiya, T., Watanabe, E., Murakoshi, J., Fumoto, K., & Tanaka, H. (2003). Development of dynamic response analysis program for floating bridges subjected to wind and wave loadings. In Proceedings of International Symposium on Ocean Space Utilization Technology, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, Ship and Ocean Foundation. National Maritime Research Institute (pp. 417–424).Google Scholar
  16. Watanabe, E., Maruyama, T., Kawamura, Y., & Tanaka, H. (1998). A new movable floating bridge project in Osaka city. In Proceedings of the IABSE Symposium Long-Span and High-Rise Structures, Kobe (pp. 155–160).Google Scholar
  17. Watanabe, E., Maruyama, T., & Tanaka, H. (1999). Design and construction of a floating swing bridge in Osaka. In Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Very Large Floating Structures (pp. 888–897). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.Google Scholar
  18. Watanabe, E., Maruyama, T., Kawamura, Y., & Tanaka, H. (2001a). Why is a floating swing arch bridge built in the Port of Osaka? In Proceedings of New York City Bridge Conference, Journal of Bridge Engineering, ASCE.Google Scholar
  19. Watanabe, E. et al. (2001b). An Osaka floating swing arch bridge towed to the site from dockyard. In Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium on Strait Crossings 2001, Bergen (pp. 293–299).Google Scholar
  20. Watanabe, E., & Utsunomiya, T. (2001). Wave response of a floating bridge with separate cylindrical pontoons. In Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium on Strait Crossings 2001, Bergen (pp. 301–308).Google Scholar
  21. Watanabe, E., Utsunomiya, T., Okafuji, T., Murakoshi, J., & Fumoto, K. (2002). Development of wave response simulation program of floating bridges and a benchmark test. In Proceedings of Second International Symposium on Steel Structures, ISSS’02, Seoul (pp. 67–78).Google Scholar
  22. Watanabe, E. (2003). Floating bridges: past and present. Structural Engineering International, 2, 128–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Watanabe, E., & Utsunomiya, T. (2003). Analysis and design of floating bridges. Progress in Structural Engineering and Materials, Wiley Interscience, 5(3), 127–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Watanabe, E., Ueda, S., Maruyama, T., & Takeda, S. (2003a). Konstruktion der Yumemai-Brücke schwimmende Bogenbrücke in Osaka. Stahlbau, 5, 323–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Watanabe, E., Utsunomiya, T., Okafuji, T., Murakoshi, J., & Fumoto, K. (2003b). Development of response simulation program of a floating bridge subjected to irregular waves. Journal of Structural Engineering, JSCE, 49A, 661–668.Google Scholar
  26. Watanabe, E. (2004). Floating bridges: Past and present (translated version of Structural International, SEI2/2003, by IABSE), Zurich, Switzerland. Russian Journal: Bridge Construction Abroad, MOCKBA 2004 (pp. 9–13) (in Russian).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Osaka Regional Planning Institute and Kyoto UniversityToyonaka, Osaka and KyotoJapan
  2. 2.Komaihaltec Inc.OsakaJapan
  3. 3.IDEA Consultants Inc. and Tottori UniversityTokyo and TottoriJapan
  4. 4.Yoshida-GumiOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations