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From the Workplace to the Classroom: How Ideas from Industry Can Inspire New Kinds of Learning

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Industry Practices, Processes and Techniques Adopted in Education

Abstract

The relationships between education and industry are many and varied. These relationships can be very direct, for example where students do some of their learning in the workplace, or practitioners engage with schools and universities by bringing their knowledge of the workplace into the classroom. There are, however, many more creative relationships that involve concepts and ideas from industry being adopted and repurposed in new ways for the educational context. We begin this chapter with an overview of the more traditional relationships between education and industry, including areas such as internships and externships, before exploring a range of ideas that have come from repurposing ideas from industry for the very different context of the classroom. These include agile methods from the software industry, lean thinking from the motor industry, creative community spaces for product development, design thinking, crowdsourcing, entrepreneurship, and industry-based models of leading change. We outline several ways in which these ideas from industry can inspire new kinds of student learning, not just to prepare them for the contemporary workplace but to provide them with essential higher-level skills that can help them to prepare for an unpredictable future.

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Parsons, D., MacCallum, K. (2022). From the Workplace to the Classroom: How Ideas from Industry Can Inspire New Kinds of Learning. In: MacCallum, K., Parsons, D. (eds) Industry Practices, Processes and Techniques Adopted in Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-3517-6_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-3517-6_1

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