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A Prototype NIRS Device to Increase Safety of Diving

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Proceedings of 10th International Conference on Mechatronics and Control Engineering (ICMCE 2021)

Abstract

A simple prototype device that may become part of the standard divers’ safety equipment is designed, constructed, and tested in order to prove the practicability of the underlying idea. The device is based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and can detect drops in oxyhemoglobin and rises in deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the blood. The proposed device not only collects biometric data, but can also autonomously identify and promptly notify anomalies so as to warn and speed up appropriate rescue activities. Easiness of use and low costs are important requirements in order to make the device suitable for everyday use by most divers. The first demonstration tests, carried out in laboratory conditions, are illustrated and discussed.

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Correspondence to Davide Animobono .

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Animobono, D., Scaradozzi, D., Conte, G. (2023). A Prototype NIRS Device to Increase Safety of Diving. In: Conte, G., Sename, O. (eds) Proceedings of 10th International Conference on Mechatronics and Control Engineering . ICMCE 2021. Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-1540-6_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-1540-6_6

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  • Online ISBN: 978-981-19-1540-6

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