Skip to main content

The Future of Interaction: Augmented Reality, Holography and Artificial Intelligence in Early Childhood Science Education

  • 301 Accesses

Part of the Lecture Notes in Educational Technology book series (LNET)

Abstract

There is little doubt that the development of technology has changed the landscape of science learning in both formal and informal settings. However, often existing research studies lack a strong conceptual underpinning in terms of pedagogic theory. Regardless of the fair body of studies relating to early childhood education and science education, early childhood science learning remains a relatively under-researched area. As representatives of advanced technologies which have been widely adopted in many fields, augmented reality (AR), holography and artificial intelligence (AI) have rarely been applied and studied in early childhood science education despite the enormous potential they offer. Drawing upon Vygotsky’s notions of the zone of proximal development (ZPD), tools and mediation, this chapter provides a new perspective by exploring the potential use of AR applications (apps), holography and AI-based tools in early childhood science education. The key argument is that these tools can potentially change the nature of the interaction between learners and learning materials, and they offer significant affordances in early childhood science education. The mission of the present chapter is to inform the design and development of educational technology based on psychological and pedagogical perspectives, and help parents and early childhood teachers understand the potential use of AR, holography and AI in science education.

Keywords

  • AR in education
  • AI in education
  • Holography in education
  • Zone of proximal development
  • Scaffolding learning
  • Mediation

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-19-0568-1_18
  • Chapter length: 28 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   119.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-19-0568-1
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 18.1
Fig. 18.2
Fig. 18.3
Fig. 18.4

References

  • Antoun, S., Auda, J., & Schneegass, S. (2018). SlidAR: Towards using AR in education. In Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia (pp. 491–498).

    Google Scholar 

  • Ausubel, D. P. (2000). The Acquisition and retention of knowledge: A cognitive view. Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Azuma, R. T. (1997). A survey of augmented reality. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 6, 355–385.

    Google Scholar 

  • Balanskat, A. (2013). Introducing tablets in schools: The Acer-European Schoolnet tablet pilot. European Schoolnet.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barkhaya, N. M. M., Abd Halim, N. D., & Yahaya, N. (2018). Development of 3DPH: HoloRead for preschool children’s learning. In 2018 IEEE 10th International Conference on Engineering Education (ICEED) (pp. 246–250). IEEE.

    Google Scholar 

  • Beatty, K. (2013). Teaching & researching: Computer-assisted language learning. Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bedesem, P. L., & Arner, T. (2019). Mobile learning in and out of the K-12 classroom. In Advanced methodologies and technologies in modern education delivery (pp. 839–849). IGI Global.

    Google Scholar 

  • Braund, M., & Reiss, M. (2004). Learning science outside the classroom. RoutledgeFalmer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bressler, D. M., & Bodzin, A. M. (2013). A mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during a mobile augmented reality science game. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(6), 505–517.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Campbell, A. G., & Santiago, K. (2016). Future mixed reality educational spaces. In Proceedings of the 2016 Future Technologies Conference (FTC) (pp. 1088–1093).

    Google Scholar 

  • Chamary, J. V. (2016). ‘Pokémon Go’ is bad if you don’t understand evolution. Forbes Magazine, 29th July, 2016.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chin, D. B., Dohmen, I. M., Cheng, B. H., Oppezzo, M. A., Chase, C. C., & Schwartz, D. L. (2010). Preparing students for future learning with teachable agents. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58(6), 649–669.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Clark, K., Logan, R., Luckin, A. M., & Oliver, M. (2009). Beyond Web 2.0: Mapping the technology landscapes of young learners. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 25, 56–69.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Clarke, B., Svanaes, S., & Zimmermann, S. (2013). One-to-one tablets in secondary schools: An evaluation study. Tablets for schools.

    Google Scholar 

  • Crompton, H., & Burke, D. (2018). The use of mobile learning in higher education: A systematic review. Computers & Education, 123, 53–64.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • de Freitas, S., & Levene, M. (2004). An investigation of the use of simulations and video gaming for supporting exploratory learning and developing higher-order cognitive skills. In Proceedings of the IADIS Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age Conference (pp. 35–42).

    Google Scholar 

  • de Freitas, S., & Oliver, M. (2006). How can exploratory learning with games and simulations within the curriculum be most effectively evaluated? Computers & Education, 46, 249–264.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Deslis, D., Kosmidis, C. V., & Tenta, E. (2018). Using a non-educational mobile game for learning in biology, geography and mathematics: Pokémon go as a case study. In International Conference on Technology and Innovation in Learning, Teaching and Education (pp. 388–396). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Edutopia. (2009). Big thinkers: Howard Gardner on multiple intelligences.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eguchi, A. (2021). AI-powered educational robotics as a learning tool to promote artificial intelligence and computer science education. In International Conference on Robotics in Education (RiE) (pp. 279–287). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • El-Gayar, O. F., Moran, M., & Hawkes, M. (2011). Students’ acceptance of tablet PCs and implications for educational institutions. Educational Technology & Society, 14(2), 58–70.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eybposh, M. H., Caira, N. W., Atisa, M., Chakravarthula, P., & Pégard, N. C. (2020). DeepCGH: 3D computer-generated holography using deep learning. Optics Express, 28(18), 26636–26650.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Flogie, A., & Aberšek, B. (2015). Transdisciplinary approach of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Journal of Baltic Science Education, 14(6), 779–790.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Foti, M. K., & Mendez, J. (2014). Mobile learning: How students use mobile devices to support learning. Journal of Literacy and Technology, 15(3), 58–78.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind. The theory of multiple intelligences. BasicBooks.

    Google Scholar 

  • Geyer, M., & Felske, F. (2011). Consumer toy or corporate tool: The iPad enters the workplace. Interactions, 18(4), 45–49.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ghuloum, H. (2010). 3D hologram technology in learning environment. In Informing Science & IT Education Conference (pp. 693–704).

    Google Scholar 

  • Gil, K., Rhim, J., Ha, T., Doh, Y. Y., & Woo, W. (2014). AR petite theater: Augmented reality storybook for supporting children’s empathy behaviour. In 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality-Media, Art, Social Science, Humanities and Design (ISMAR-MASH'D) (pp. 13–20). IEEE.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gnidovec, T., Žemlja, M., Dolenec, A., & Torkar, G. (2020). Using augmented reality and the structure–behaviour–function model to teach lower secondary school students about the human circulatory system. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 29(6), 774–784.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harel, I. E., & Papert, S. E. (1991). Constructionism. Ablex Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harry Potter: Wizards unite. https://www.harrypotterwizardsunite.com

  • Horisaki, R., Takagi, R., & Tanida, J. (2018). Deep-learning-generated holography. Applied Optics (14), 3859–3863.

    Google Scholar 

  • Horst, J. S., & Houston-Price, C. (Eds.). (2016). An open book: What and how young children learn from picture and story books. Frontiers Media SA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ierache, J., Mangiarua, N. A., Becerra, M. E., & Igarza, S. (2018). Framework for the development of augmented reality applications applied to education games. In International Conference on Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Computer Graphics (pp. 340–350). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jeon, T. H. (2000). Making holograms in middle and Higgs schools. In Proceedings of the Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers, 3831 (pp. 223–228).

    Google Scholar 

  • Jiwa, S., & Lavelle, D. (2003). Evaluating the quality of learning through gaming and simuation. In The international simulation and gaming yearbook (pp. 233–235), vol. 11.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kalansooriya, P., Marasinghe, A., & Bandara, K. M. D. N. (2015). Assessing the applicability of 3D holographic technology as an enhanced technology for distance learning. Journal of Education, 1(16), 43–57.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kanellidou, M., & Zacharia, Z. (2019). Visualisations in primary education. Effects on the conceptual understanding of basic astronomy concepts for children up to ten years old. In EDULEARN19 Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Palma, Spain, 1–3 July, 2019 (pp. 3080–3084). IATED Academy.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koć-Januchta, M. M., Schönborn, K. J., Tibell, L. A., Chaudhri, V. K., & Heller, H. C. (2020). Engaging with biology by asking questions: Investigating students’ interaction and learning with an artificial intelligence-enriched textbook. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 58(6), 1190–1224.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kularbphettong, K., Roonrakwit, P., & Chutrtong, J. (2018). Effectiveness of enhancing classroom by using augmented reality technology. In International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (pp. 125–133). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kyei-Blankson, L., Ntuli, E., & Donnelly, H. (2019). Establishing the importance of interaction and presence to student learning in online environments. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 30(4), 539–560.

    Google Scholar 

  • Laine, T. H., Nygren, E., Dirin, A., & Suk, H. J. (2016). Science spots AR: A platform for science learning games with augmented reality. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64(3), 507–531.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lasica, I. E., Meletiou-Mavrotheris, M., Mavrotheris, E., Pitsikalis, S., Katzis, K., Dimopoulos, C., & Tiniakos, C. (2019). Enlivened laboratories within STEM education (EL-STEM): A case study of augmented reality in secondary education. In Augmented reality in educational settings (pp. 267–294). Brill Sense.

    Google Scholar 

  • LEGO. MINDSTORMS. Retrieved from: https://www.lego.com/en-gb/themes/mindstorms

  • Mason, L., & Boscolo, P. (2000). Writing and conceptual change. What change? Instructional Science, 28, 199–226.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mayilyan, H. (2019). Augmented reality in education, AR globe project assessment in actual teaching-learning environment. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, 18(3), 1–14.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McLaren, B. M., DeLeeuw, K. E., & Mayer, R. E. (2011). Polite web-based intelligent tutors: Can they improve learning in classrooms? Computers & Education, 56(3), 574–584.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Microsoft. HoloLens 2. Retrieved from: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/hololens

  • Mitchell, A., & Savill-Smith, C. (2004). The use of computer and video games for learning: A review of the literature. Learning and Skills Development Agency, London.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moro, C., Phelps, C., Jones, D., & Stromberga, Z. (2020). Using holograms to enhance learning in health sciences and medicine. Medical Science Educator, 30(4), 1351–1352.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nikolopoulou, K., & Kousloglou, M. (2019). Mobile learning in science: A study in secondary education in Greece. Creative Education, 10(06), 1271.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nye, B. D., Davis, D. M., Rizvi, S. Z., Carr, K., Swartout, W., Thacker, R., & Shaw, K. (2021). Feasibility and usability of MentorPal, a framework for rapid development of virtual mentors. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 53(1), 21–43.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Oliver, M. (2013). Learning technology: Theorising the tools we study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(1), 31–43.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Oliver, M. (2016). What is technology. In N. Rushby & D. W. Surry (Eds.), The Wiley handbook of learning technology. Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Orcos, L., Arís, N., Fernández, C. E., & Magreñán, Á. A. (2017). Holographic tools for science learning. In International Workshop on Learning Technology for Education in Cloud (pp. 36–45). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Orcos, L., Jordán, C., & Magreñán, A. (2019). 3D visualisation through the hologram for the learning of area and volume concepts. Mathematics, 7(3), 247.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Orcos, L., & Magrenan, A. A. (2018). The hologram as a teaching medium for the acquisition of STEM contents. International Journal of Learning Technology, 13(2), 163–177.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Papadakis, S. (2016). Creativity and innovation in European education: 10 years eTwinning. Past, present and the future. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 8(3/4), 279–296.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papadakis, S., Kalogiannakis, M., Orfanakis, V., & Zaranis, N. (2016). Using scratch and app inventor for teaching introductory programming in secondary education. A case study. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 8(3/4), 217–233.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papadakis, S., Kalogiannakis, M., & Zaranis, N. (2017). Designing and creating an educational app rubric for preschool teachers. Education and Information Technologies, 22(6), 3147–3165.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Park, M. S., Choi, Y. H., Ha, S. J., Gentet, P., Lee, J. H., Hwang, L. H., et al. (2020). A feasibility study on the lifelong education program of holography using simple hologram making tools. International Journal of Internet, Broadcasting and Communication, 12(4), 128–136.

    Google Scholar 

  • Parmaxi, A., & Zaphiris, P. (2014). The evolvement of constructionism: An overview of the literature. In International Conference on Learning and Collaboration Technologies (pp. 452–461). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. (1932/1977). The moral judgement of the child. Penguin Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. (1959/2002). The language and thought of the child (3rd ed.). Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. (1970/1972). The principles of genetic epistemology (W. Mays, Trans.). Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    Google Scholar 

  • Podolefsky, N. (2012). Learning science through computer games and simulations.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pokémon Go. https://www.pokemongo.com/en-gb/

  • Prensky, M. (2001). Digital games-based learning. McGraw Hill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reiss, M. J., Millar, R., & Osborne, J. (1999). Beyond 2000: Science/biology education for the future. Journal of Biological Education, 33(2), 68–70.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Roslan, R. K., & Ahmad, A. (2017). 3D spatial visualisation skills training application for school students using hologram pyramid. International Journal on Informatics Visualisation, 1(4), 170–174.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schnackenberg, H. (2013). Tablet technologies and education. International Journal of Education and Practice, 1(4), 44–50.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Shelomi, M., Richards, A., Li, I., & Okido, Y. (2012). A phylogeny and evolutionary history of the Pokémon. Annals of Improbable Research, 18(4), 15.

    Google Scholar 

  • Squire, K. (2002). Cultural framing of computer/video games. Game Studies, 2(1).

    Google Scholar 

  • Strouse, G. A, Nyhout, A., & Ganea, P. A. (2018). The role of book features in young children’s transfer of information from picture books to real-world contexts. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, 50.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swan, K. (2002). Building learning communities in online courses: The importance of interaction. Education, Communication & Information, 2(1), 23–49.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S. (2002). Chemical misconceptions—Prevention, diagnosis and cure, Volume 1: Theoretical background. Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S. (2009). Progressing science education: Constructing the scientific research programme into the contingent nature of learning science. Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S. (2018). Scaffolding learning: Principles for effective teaching and the design of classroom resources. In M. Abend (Ed.), Effective teaching and learning: Perspectives, strategies and implementation (pp. 1–43). Nova Science Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S. (2019). Exploring, imagining, sharing: Early development and education in science. In D. Whitebread, V. Grau, K. Kumpulainen, M. M. McClelland, N. E. Perry, & D. Pino-Pasternak (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of developmental psychology and early childhood education (pp. 348–364). Sage.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S. (2020). Mediated learning leading development—The social development theory of Lev Vygotsky. In B. Akpan & T. Kennedy (Eds.), Science education in theory and practice: An introductory guide to learning theory (pp. 277–291). Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S., & Brock, R. (2018). A study to explore the potential of designing teaching activities to scaffold learning: Understanding circular motion. In M. Abend (Ed.), Effective teaching and learning: Perspectives, strategies and implementation (pp. 45–85). Nova Science Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taber, K. S., & Li, X. (2021). The vicarious and the virtual: A Vygotskian perspective on digital learning resources as tools for scaffolding conceptual development. In A. M. Columbus (Ed.), Advances in psychology research (Vol. 143, pp. 1–72). Nova.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thornton, T., Ernst, J. V., & Clark, A. C. (2012). Augmented reality as a visual and spatial learning tool in technology education. Technology and Engineering Teacher, 71(8), 18–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Time. (1999). The ultimate game freak.

    Google Scholar 

  • Topsakal, E., & Topsakal, O. (2019). Augmented reality to encourage preschool children in foreign language learning. In International Conference on Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Computer Graphics (pp. 286–294). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tuomi, I. (2018). The impact of artificial intelligence on learning, teaching, and education. Publications Office of the European Union.

    Google Scholar 

  • Turk, H., & Seckin-Kapucu, M. (2021). Innovative technology applications in science educations: Digital holography. Journal of Education in Science, Environment and Health (JESEH), 7(2), 156–170.

    Google Scholar 

  • Verenikina, I. (2010). Vygotsky in twenty-first-century research. In EdMedia+ innovate learning (pp. 16–25). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

    Google Scholar 

  • Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Walker, R. A. (2013). Holograms as teaching agents. In Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 415(1). IOP Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Watson, T. S., & Skinner, C. H. (2012). Encyclopedia of school psychology. Springer Science & Business Media.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weinberger, A., Ertl, B., Fischer, F., & Mandl, H. (2005). Epistemic and social scripts in computer-supported collaborative learning. Instructional Science, 33(1), 1–30.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • White, R. T., & Mitchell, I. J. (1994). Metacognition and the quality of learning. Studies in Science Education, 23, 21–37.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Whitebread, D., Bingham, S., Grau, V., Pino Pasternak, D., & Sangster, C. (2007). Development of metacognition and self-regulated learning in young children: role of collaborative and peer-assisted learning. Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 6(3), 433–455.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Winter, J., Winterbottom, M., & Wilson, E. (2010). Developing a user guide to integrating new technologies in science teaching and learning: Teachers’ and pupils’ perceptions of their affordances. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 19(2), 261–267.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Woods, S. (2004). Loading the dice: The challenge of serious video games. Game Studies, 4(1), 207.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zawacki-Richter, O., Marín, V. I., Bond, M., & Gouverneur, F. (2019). Systematic review of research on artificial intelligence applications in higher education—Where are the educators? International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, 16(1), 1–27.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Zimmerman, B. J. (1989). A social cognitive view of self-regulated academic learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 81, 329–339.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Zimmerman, B. J. (2000). Attaining self-regulation: A social cognitive perspective. In M. Boekaerts, P. R. Pintrich, & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation: Theory, research, and applications (pp. 13–39). Academic Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Xinyue Li .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Li, X., Taber, K.S. (2022). The Future of Interaction: Augmented Reality, Holography and Artificial Intelligence in Early Childhood Science Education. In: Papadakis, S., Kalogiannakis, M. (eds) STEM, Robotics, Mobile Apps in Early Childhood and Primary Education. Lecture Notes in Educational Technology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-0568-1_18

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-0568-1_18

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-19-0567-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-19-0568-1

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)