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Abdominal Tuberculosis: A Brief History

Abstract

Human tuberculosis infection dates back to ancient times and is postulated to have emerged in East Africa. Its footprints can also be found in early Egyptian, Vedic, and Chinese literature. Over a period of time, its prevalence got limited to the developing countries. However, as more cases of human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) infections are getting recognized, it is again re-emerging in the western population. Due to a myriad of clinical presentations and close mimicry to Crohn’s disease, the management of abdominal tuberculosis still remains a challenge even for the experts. The postulates of Logan and Paustian and the recent advances in radiology now pave an easy and evidence-based path for its diagnosis by clinicians. Over the centuries, there has been a significant progress in its treatment, i.e., from a superstitious “Royal touch” to a comprehensive Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) therapy. The advances in therapy of abdominal tuberculosis are traced in this chapter.

Keywords

  • History
  • Gastrointestinal tuberculosis
  • Tuberculous peritonitis

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Fig. 1.1

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Acknowledgment

Dr. Vishal Sharma for creating the Figure.

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Kumar, A., Mandavdhare, H.S. (2022). Abdominal Tuberculosis: A Brief History. In: Sharma, V. (eds) Tuberculosis of the Gastrointestinal system. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-9053-2_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-9053-2_1

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