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Biodeterioration of Sandalwood (Santalum album L.): Agents and their Management

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Science of Wood Degradation and its Protection

Abstract

Indian sandalwood is a highly priced tree, which grows naturally in different parts of India. Due to abiotic and biotic factors, particularly due to anthropological factors, the trees have become vulnerable in recent years, leading to widening the gap between demand and supply of sandalwood to the various industries. Biodeteriorating agents like fungi, insect borers, and termites play a crucial role in deterioration of sandalwood. The combined action of these agents on mechanically wounded or stressed trees increases the process of degradation. A detailed understanding of these agents and their interactions with the sandalwood is essential for managing them in an ecologically and economically sound basis.

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Sundararaj, R., Padma, S., Kavya, N., Manjula, K.N. (2022). Biodeterioration of Sandalwood (Santalum album L.): Agents and their Management. In: Sundararaj, R. (eds) Science of Wood Degradation and its Protection. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-8797-6_10

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