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Coloniality and Retirement Migration to the Global South

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Retirement Migration to the Global South

Abstract

Matthew Hayes examines how older adult migrants to Essaouira, Morocco, make sense of and give meaning to perceptions of material inequality and difference that are part of their day-to-day lives. He focuses on one particular cultural narrative which shows that one way retirees from Europe make sense of global-scale inequalities in their everyday lives in Essaouira is by switching between cultural codes that refer to material inequality and hardship, on the one hand, and essentialized cultures of work and consumerism, on the other hand. He demonstrates that by accounting for material inequalities through narratives about culture, lifestyle migrants mark distance between themselves and other global migrants. The effect, he argues, is the reproduction of a form of epistemic coloniality, which helps to stabilize global hierarchies that might otherwise be challenged through relational sociology.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Though many French participants emphasized the difference between the ‘protectorate’ and a colony, Abu-Lughod (1980) points out that the legal status of ‘protectorate’ granted the French military authorities more leverage in the colony, without having to consult the National Assembly, where the anti-colonial French Section of the Workers International (SFIO) was in the ascendant in the decade prior to the First World War.

  2. 2.

    Throughout, quotes are my translation from interviews conducted in French.

  3. 3.

    It is worth noting that in Brussels, one of Europe’s wealthiest cities, 37.8% of the population were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2019 according to Statbel, many of whom would be members of racialized immigrant communities: https://statbel.fgov.be/en/themes/households/poverty-and-living-conditions/risk-poverty-or-social-exclusion, accessed November 14, 2020.

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Hayes, M. (2022). Coloniality and Retirement Migration to the Global South. In: Schweppe, C. (eds) Retirement Migration to the Global South. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6999-6_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6999-6_3

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