Skip to main content

Liming and Ole Talk: A Site of Negotiation, Contestation and Relationships

  • 148 Accesses

Abstract

Liming and ole talk, a localized form of interaction and communication in Trinidad and Tobago, evolved from the diverse histories and peoples of the country. Liming and ole talk has always allowed for negotiation, contestation and relationships, and those who come to lime know that the valued and treasured nature of a lime will ensure the wellbeing of all limers. There are no formal rules that prescribe how a lime should take place though there is an expectation that certain practices such as sharing food and/ or drinking, and certain behaviours like teasing and talking over one another will occur, and that the respected atmosphere of a lime is to be maintained. A lime allows for the airing of concerns and the collective intention to address concerns with the aim of moving on and moving forward. Humour, as a significant and crucial feature of a lime, and the ole talk that takes place, help to reduce tension and give limers an opportunity to acknowledge and support views that may have been contrary to their own.

Keywords

  • Liming
  • Ole talk
  • Negotiation
  • Contestation
  • Conflict resolution
  • Trinidad and Tobago

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-16-6779-4_6
  • Chapter length: 15 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-16-6779-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    A Trinidadian/Caribbean dish made with rice, peas and meat.

  2. 2.

    A traditional Trinidadian dish made with dasheen/taro leaves.

References

  • Anzaldúa, G. (1987). Borderlands/ La Frontera: The New Mestiza. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Avruch, K. (1998). Culture and conflict resolution. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barrow, C. (1998). Introduction and overview. In C. Barrow (Ed.), Caribbean portraits: Essays on gender ideologies and identities (pp. xi–xxxviii). Kingston, Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burt, R. S. (1997). The contingent value of social capital. Administrative Science Quarterly, 42, 339–65.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clarke, R., & Charles, R. N. (2012). Caribbean liming: A metaphor for building social capital. International Journal of Cross Cultural Management12(3), 299–313.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Collier, M. J., Parsons, R. J., Hadeed, L., & Nathaniel, K. A. (2011). Problematizing national dimensions: Community members’ views of conflict management in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies. The Howard Journal of Communications22(2), 140–162.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dalzell, T., & Victor, T. (2014). The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English. Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Deosaran, R. (1987). Some issues in multiculturalism: the case of Trinidad & Tobago in the Post-Colonial Era. Caribbean Quarterly33(1–2), 61–80.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fernandez, A. (2020). Sharing our way: A study of Caribbean identity using liming as culturally affirming research methodology. A thesis submitted to Auckland University of Technology in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), New Zealand.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fernández Santana, A., Nakhid, C., Nakhid-Chatoor, M., & Wilson, S. (2019). Liming and Ole Talk: Foundation for a culturally relevant Caribbean methodology. Caribbean Studies Journal, 47(1), 99–123.

    Google Scholar 

  • Greene, E. (1974). Race vs politics in Guyana. Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the West Indies.

    Google Scholar 

  • Henke, H. (2004). Ariel’s ethos on the moral economy of Caribbean experience. Cultural Critique, 56, 33–63.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lazarus-Black, M. (2008). Vanishing complainants: The place of violence in family, gender, work and law. Caribbean Studies, 36(1), 25–51.

    Google Scholar 

  • LeBaron, M. (2003). Bridging cultural conflicts. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • McClish, C. L. (2016). Good liming in Trinidad: The art of doing something. Liminalities12(4), 1.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nakhid, C. & Farrugia, C. (2021). Affirming methodologies in two African diasporic contexts—The sharing of knowledge through liming and ole talk among Caribbean Islanders in Aotearoa New Zealand and the practice of sharing with Sydney-based Africans. Peabody Journal of Education, 96(2).

    Google Scholar 

  • Nakhid, C., Mosca, J. & Nakhid-Schuster, S. (2019) Liming as research methodology, ole talk as research method—A Caribbean methodology. Journal of Education and Development in the Caribbean, 18(2). https://www.mona.uwi.edu/soe/publications/jedic/article/624

  • Nakhid-Chatoor, M., Nakhid, C., Wilson, S., Fernandez Santana, A. (2018). Exploring liming and ole talk as a culturally relevant methodology for researching with Caribbean people. International Journal of Qualitative Methods. https://doi.org/10.1177/1609406918813772

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wendell DeRiggs, A. (2009). Reflections and ole talk. London: Hibiscus.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Camille Nakhid .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Nakhid, C. (2022). Liming and Ole Talk: A Site of Negotiation, Contestation and Relationships. In: Te Maihāroa, K., Ligaliga, M., Devere, H. (eds) Decolonising Peace and Conflict Studies through Indigenous Research. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6779-4_6

Download citation