Skip to main content

Positioning TVET Lecturer Identities at the Centre of TVET Lecturer Education and Training in a Post-COVID-19 Context

Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET,volume 34)

Abstract

The Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college sector in South Africa is seen as central to skills development and the revival of the economy. However, the sector remains one of the weakest in the post-school system. This chapter provides a synopsis of the evolution of the post-apartheid college sector context in South Africa, the nature of the new programme offerings for pre- and in-service training as well as increasing moves towards professionalisation of the sector. This discussion is presented against the backdrop of the broader policy context in the country, specifically considering the different needs of current TVET lecturers, who range from unqualified; academically qualified, but without workplace pedagogy; trained for the schooling sector; to the ideal—those who are both academically and professionally qualified. While this rather lopsided continuum is not unique to South Africa, the way it is being addressed is important to articulate and reflect on. The changes in the management and governance of the colleges prior to the establishment of the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and the impact these changes had on lecturers’ job security and conditions of employment are key factors that we will explore in our contribution. The college sector lost lecturing staff during this time, further reducing its capacity to meet the training needs of the country. While seemingly intractable problems such as slow uptake of newly introduced qualifications for TVET lecturers and compliance oriented continuing professional development (CPD) programmes can be overcome, the impact of COVID-19 on this sector should not be underestimated. Of course, this uncertain future also offers an opportunity to make changes that may previously have been politically unpalatable. In this chapter, we try to imagine what a more explicitly conceptualised workplace pedagogy would comprise to produce a pipeline of well-trained and professionally orientated TVET lecturers.

The opinions expressed in this chapter are not necessarily those of the organisations where the respective authors are based.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-16-6474-8_18
  • Chapter length: 17 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   129.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-16-6474-8
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    The 13 priority trades are: Bricklayer, Electrician, Millwright, Boilermaker, Plumber, Mechanic including Automotive Mechanic, Diesel Mechanic, Carpenter and Joiner, Welder, Rigger, Fitter and Turner, Mechanical Fitter; and Pipe Fitter.

  2. 2.

    https://nadsc.dhet.gov.za/.

References

  • Blom, J. P. (2006). The ideal of an integrated national qualifications framework. Unpublished doctoral thesis. University of Pretoria.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blom, R. (2014). Throwing good money after bad: The barriers South African vocational teachers experience in becoming competent educators. In Inaugural International Research Conference, 11–13 July, 2014. Oxford University: Further Education Research Association.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blom, R. (2016). Towards a vocational pedagogy for South African TVET educators. Occasional Paper for the Centre for Researching Education and Labour at the University of the Witwatersrand.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2009). National Education Policy Act 27, 1996: Call for comments on the national policy framework for lecturer development in FET colleges in South Africa. Government Gazette, 3259. Author.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2011). Green paper for post-school education and training. Pretoria: DHET.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2013a). Policy on professional qualifications for lecturers in technical and vocational education. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2013b). White paper for post-school education and training: Building an expanded, effective and integrated post-school education. Pretoria: DHET.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2014). Qualification profile of lecturers employed in public TVET colleges in South Africa. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2015). Policy framework for workplace-based learning in an integrated and differentiated South African post-school education and training system. Pretoria: DHET. Draft.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2016). Lecturer survey. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2017a). Lecturer development strategy. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2017b). Draft national plan for post-school education and training. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2019). Continuing professional development framework for TVET college lecturers: CPD4TVET. Pretoria: DHET. Unpublished draft.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2020a). DHET Strategic Plan 2020/2021–2024/2025. Author.

    Google Scholar 

  • DHET. (2020b). Public college administration measures. Pretoria: DHET. Draft. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • DoE. (2001). A new institutional landscape for public. Further Education and Training Colleges. Pretoria: DoE.

    Google Scholar 

  • DoL. (2005). National skills development strategy. Pretoria: DoL.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gaffoor, A., & Van Der Bijl, A. (2019). Factors influencing the intention of students at a selected TVET college in the Western Cape to complete their National Certificate. (Vocational) Business Studies Programme. Journal of Vocational, Adult and Continuing Education and Training, 2(2), 23–42.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hofmeyr, J. (2017). Summative evaluation report of the DHET. SwissCham College Improvement Project. Unpublished report.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hordern, J. (2014). How is vocational knowledge recontextualised? Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 66(1), 22–38.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • HRDSA. (2017). Human resource development strategy for South Africa. Pretoria: HRDSA.

    Google Scholar 

  • IPSS. (2020). Understanding the TVET College Sector: A concept note. DHET-NSF Research Programme on TVET. Pretoria: IPSS. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lucas, B. (2014). Vocational pedagogy. What it is, why it matters and how to put it into practice. Report of the UNESCO-UNEVOC online conference, 12 – 26 May 2014. UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training.

    Google Scholar 

  • Makgato, M. (2019). STEM for sustainable skills for the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Snapshot at understanding the TVET college sector: A concept note. IntechOpen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Makgato, M., & Moila, O. (2019). Partnerships between TVET colleges and industry to enhance work-related skills. World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, 17(3), 332–337.

    Google Scholar 

  • McGrath, S. (2004). Reviewing the development of the South African further education and training college sector ten years after the end of apartheid. Journal of Vocational Education and Training, 56(1), 137–160.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McGrath, S., & Powell, L. (2015). Skills for sustainable development: Vocational education and training beyond 2015. Learning for sustainable futures. Making the connections. In 13th International Conference on Education and Development. 15–17 September, 2015, University of Oxford.

    Google Scholar 

  • McLean, R., & Wilson, D. (2009). International handbook of education for the changing world of work: Bridging academic and vocational learning. UNEVOC, International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Springer Science+Business.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • NPC. (2012). National development plan – Vision for 2030. Pretoria: NPC.

    Google Scholar 

  • NPC. (2020). Education and skills for the economy and links to labour markets in South Africa. Pretoria: NPC.

    Google Scholar 

  • OECD. (2014). A skills beyond school review of South Africa. OECD Reviews of Vocational Education and Training. Paris: OECD.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paterson, A., Keevy, J., & Boka, K. (2017). Exploring a work-based values approach in South African TVET colleges to improve employability of youth: Literature review. JET Education Services.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pitso, K. (2018). Designing a framework for the advancement of lecturer capacity in developing graduate attributes at a TVET college. PhD thesis. University of the Free State.

    Google Scholar 

  • Powell, L., & Hall, G. (2002). Quantitative overview of the further education and training college sector: The new landscape. Department of Education.

    Google Scholar 

  • Republic of South Africa. (2005). Further education and training colleges Act, 16 of 2006. Government Printer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, J. (2017). Summative evaluation of an ETDP SET. A project to train 280 lecturers from 28 colleges through WIL. Unpublished.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taylor, V., & Van der Bijl, A. (2020). Implementation guidelines for workplace-based work-integrated learning in industry, business or community-oriented work environments in professional qualifications for TVET and ACET educators and lecturers. Draft.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van der Bijl, A., & Taylor, V. (2018). Work-integrated learning for TVET lecturers: Articulating industry and college practices. Journal of Vocational, Adult and Continuing Education and Training, 1(1), 126–145.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to James Keevy .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Blom, R., Keevy, J., Green, W., Mathey, M., Magnus, G., Sethusha, S. (2022). Positioning TVET Lecturer Identities at the Centre of TVET Lecturer Education and Training in a Post-COVID-19 Context. In: Bünning, F., Spöttl, G., Stolte, H. (eds) Technical and Vocational Teacher Education and Training in International and Development Co-Operation. Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects, vol 34. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6474-8_18

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6474-8_18

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-16-6473-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-16-6474-8

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)