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Legislating Corporate Sustainable Development Agreements as a Corporate Social Responsibility Response for Mining Communities in Zambia: A Case Study of Kabwe Lead-Zinc Mine, Zambia

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Corporate Approaches to Sustainable Development

Abstract

The mining legacy in Zambia has seen the rise and fall of towns and cities built around the mines which flourish when the mine is in its operational phase but perish once the mine closes. Sustainable development initiatives through corporate social responsibility frameworks have been formulated for community development requirements in mining laws for resource-rich countries to implement in their countries. A research study was established to investigate the effects of the closure of Kabwe lead-zinc in Zambia, on the local community in the context of sustainable development, and examine the laws and policies that affect the mining sector in the country. This was to ascertain the impact that these have on communities adjacent to mining operations, across the mine life cycle, and propose what legal reforms can be enacted to actualize the concept of sustainable development through corporate social responsibility initiatives in the mining communities. A mixed research approach was adopted using both the quantitative and qualitative methods. Purposive and snowballing sampling techniques were used to select respondents. A total of 100 questionnaires were administered and the study received a response rate of 79%. Closed and open questionnaires, focus group discussions and interview guides were used to collect data from respondents. The study revealed that due to lack of laws on the sustainable development of the mining community at the time of the closure of the mine in Kabwe, economic activities dwindled and most former mine workers have ended up being engaged in other activities, mostly agriculture, to earn a living. The study also revealed the need to have laws in place to regulate the mine closure in terms of benefits but revealed a general lack of understanding on the concept of sustainable development amongst the local community. The study recommended the need for developing an advocacy strategy on the concept of sustainable development, as well as detailed examination of the enforcement mechanism and laws related to sustainable development in mining from which appropriate regulatory amendments can be promulgated and enforced.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank African Development Bank and the University of Zambia for giving us research funds to conduct this study. We would also like to thank all the participants that enabled us collect the data for this research.

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Chibbabbuka, R.H., Masinja, J., Franco, I.B. (2022). Legislating Corporate Sustainable Development Agreements as a Corporate Social Responsibility Response for Mining Communities in Zambia: A Case Study of Kabwe Lead-Zinc Mine, Zambia. In: Franco, I.B. (eds) Corporate Approaches to Sustainable Development. Science for Sustainable Societies. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6421-2_7

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