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Market of Dietary Supplements: Analysis of Health Benefits and Risk in Cancer

Abstract

In the current state of the art, there is widespread usage of dietary supplements (DSs) by cancer patients both during the cancer treatment and during the drug holidays as well. However, there is lack of empirical data in relation to their safety or efficacy. The available research data show that there should be judicious usage of DSs by cancer patients, which otherwise may aggravate the progression of cancer. Besides these ground clinical realities about the benefits of DSs in cancer prevention, the market of DSs is growing in logarithmic fashion. US people spent over $36 billion in 2014 on dietary supplements. In fact, the consumer victimizing advertisements of DSs are easily accessed by cancer survivors through Internet, social media and television and inspire them to use it as an adjunct or traditional therapy. These self-prescriptions of DSs by cancer patients are mostly based on anecdotal evidences. More often owing to the drastic change in the psychology and mindset of cancer patients, they do not inform the inclusions of DSs to oncologist or their primary caretakers. There is need to rationalize the intake of DSs and quantify the does by assessing the analytical profile of need and deficiency in individual cancer type/patient so as to avoid the DS-related adversities and minimize the financial burden.

Keywords

  • Dietary supplements
  • Guidelines
  • Health benefits
  • Risk in cancer
  • Market

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Abbreviations

ABTS:

Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention

ACS:

American Cancer Society

AICR:

American Institute for Cancer Research

ASN:

American Society for Nutrition

CARET:

Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial

CCS:

Canadian Cancer Society

CRUK:

Cancer Research UK

CSC:

Cancer Support Community

DS:

Dietary supplements

DSHEA:

Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act

ESPEN:

The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism

NCCN:

National Comprehensive Cancer Network

NCI:

National Cancer Institute

NHANES:

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

SELECT:

The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial

WCRF:

World Cancer Research Fund

WHO:

World Health Organization

WHO: ECAC:

European Code Against Cancer

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Gacche, R.N. (2021). Market of Dietary Supplements: Analysis of Health Benefits and Risk in Cancer. In: Dietary Research and Cancer . Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-6050-4_14

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