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High Altitude Edible Plants: A Great Resource for Human Health and their Socio-Economic Significance

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Abstract

As the name suggests, edible plants are those plants which can be eaten. Out of the twenty thousand species of edible plants found around the world, only twenty species make up the majority of our food. However, there are still numerous plants which are lesser known but can be eaten and also have nutritional and medicinal value. These natural products have been an important part of food, economy and health care for most of the population. Traditional knowledge of high altitude edible and medicinal plants has served as the base for many breakthrough discoveries especially in the medicinal field. Organized and systemic cultivation of high altitude of medicinal plants with efficient procession and marketing strategies may boost up the economy of not only the tribal people but also to the nation’s economy. This chapter discusses about the traditional knowledge about the edible and medicinal plants, edible plants of high altitude regions of Himalayas, high altitude medicinal plants as a source for treating major health ailments, modern drugs derived from traditional medicines derived from high altitudes, biological radioprotection by high altitude plants, wealth of ethnic and medicinal high altitude medicinal plants, ethnic veterinary medicinal plants from high altitude regions, description some of the wild edible plant species of the high altitude regions of Himalayas, high altitude medicinal herbs as socio-economic resource, cultivation of high altitude edible medicinal plants of Himalayas for economic growth and management, conservation and prospect of high altitude medicinal plants.

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Jahangir, M.A. et al. (2022). High Altitude Edible Plants: A Great Resource for Human Health and their Socio-Economic Significance. In: Masoodi, M.H., Rehman, M.U. (eds) Edible Plants in Health and Diseases . Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-4880-9_7

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