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Health Beliefs and Communication: Conceptual Approaches

Abstract

The chapter “Health beliefs and communication: conceptual approaches” examines both classical and modern theoretical approaches in communication studies in general and health communication. It provides brief introductions to conceptual approaches from Austin’s Speech Acts (actor) through Habermas (conditions for acceptance) and Moscovici (types of acceptance) to individual-centered models of health behavior and community-level approaches, some of which focus on the construction of psychological knowledge and practice that aim to be emancipatory and transformative of health-damaging social relations.

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Falade, B. (2021). Health Beliefs and Communication: Conceptual Approaches. In: Falade, B., Murire, M. (eds) Health Communication and Disease in Africa. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-2546-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-2546-6_2

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