Skip to main content

Social Support Within and Outside Care Networks: Experiences of Live-in Migrant Care Workers in the Netherlands

  • 160 Accesses

Abstract

Live-in care often puts migrant care workers in precarious positions. However, precariousness is not a self-evident outcome. Drawing on literature about care networks and migrants’ social networks, this chapter provides insight into how social support shapes the experience of precarious work. Based on interviews with migrant care workers in the Netherlands, as well as formal and informal caregivers, and the staff of intermediary organizations, this study demonstrates that client-related actors, such as family caregivers and nurses, and non-client-related actors, such as live-in migrant care (LIMC) workers’ relatives and friends ‘here’ and ‘there’, play an important role in shaping the experience of precariousness. Furthermore, our study shows that large differences exist between LIMC workers regarding their access to emotional and practical support, related to contract-based differences in mobility patterns.

This chapter draws on two earlier publications: Van Bochove and Zur Kleinsmiede (2020) and Van Bochove et al. (2017).

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-16-2237-3_12
  • Chapter length: 23 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-16-2237-3
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 12.1
Fig. 12.2

References

  • Bauer, G., & Österle, A. (2013). Migrant care labour: The commodification and redistribution of care and emotional work. Social Policy and Society, 12(3), 461.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boccagni, P. (2014). Caring about migrant care workers: From private obligations to transnational social welfare? Critical Social Policy, 34(2), 221–240.

    Google Scholar 

  • Broese van Groenou, M., Jacobs, M., Zwart-Olde, I., & Deeg, D. J. (2016). Mixed care networks of community-dwelling older adults with physical health impairments in the Netherlands. Health and Social Care in the Community, 24(1), 95–104.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bruquetas-Callejo, M. (2020). Long-term care crisis in the Netherlands and migration of live-in care workers: Transnational trajectories, coping strategies and motivation mixes. International Migration, 58(1), 105–118.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Da Roit, B., & van Bochove, M. (2017). Migrant care work going Dutch? The emergence of a live-in migrant care market and the restructuring of the Dutch long-term care system. Social Policy & Administration, 51(1), 76–94.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Da Roit, B., & Weicht, B. (2013). Migrant care work and care, migration and employment regimes: A fuzzy-set analysis. Journal of European Social Policy, 23(5), 469–486.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davies, A., & Mans, L. (2015). Thuisbezorgd—Inwonende buitenlandse zorgverleners als oplossing? Podium voor Bio-ethiek, 22(2), 23–26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Finch, B. K., & Vega, W. A. (2003). Acculturation stress, social support, and self-rated health among Latinos in California. Journal of Immigrant Health, 5(3), 109–117.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hellgren, Z. (2015). Markets, regimes, and the role of stakeholders: Explaining precariousness of migrant domestic/care workers in different institutional frameworks. Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, 22(2), 220–241.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Horn, V., Schweppe, C., Böcker, A., et al. (2019). Live-in migrant care worker arrangements in Germany and the Netherlands: Motivations and justifications in family decision-making. International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, 13(2), 83–113.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jacobs, M. T., Broese van Groenou, M. I., Aartsen, M. J., & Deeg, D. J. (2016). Diversity in older adults’ care networks: The added value of individual beliefs and social network proximity. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 73(2), 326–336.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kalleberg, A. L. (2009). Precarious work, insecure workers: Employment relations in transition. American Sociological Review, 74(1), 1–22.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kinman, G., & Leggetter, S. (2016). Emotional labour and wellbeing: What protects nurses? Healthcare, 4(4), 89.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Leiber, S., Matuszczyk, K., & Rossow, V. (2019). Private labor market intermediaries in the Europeanized live-in care market between Germany and Poland: A typology. Zeitschrift für Sozialreform, 65(3), 365–392.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leiber, S., Rossow, V., Österle, A., & Frerk, T. (2021). Yet another black box: brokering agencies in the evolving market for live-in migrant care work in Austria and Germany. International Journal of Care and Caring, 5(2), 187–208.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lutz, H. (2016). When home becomes a workplace: Domestic work as an ordinary job in Germany? In H. Lutz (Ed.), Migration and domestic work (pp. 55–72). Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Oxman-Martinez, J., Hanley, J., & Cheung, L. (2004). Another look at the live-in-caregivers program: An analysis of an action research survey conducted by PINAY, the Quebec Filipino women’s association with the centre for applied family studies. Centre de recherche interuniversitaire de Montréal sur l’immigration, l’intégration et la dynamique urbaine.

    Google Scholar 

  • Salami, B., Duggleby, W., & Rajani, F. (2017). The perspective of employers/families and care recipients of migrant live-in caregivers: A scoping review. Health and Social Care in the Community, 25(6), 1667–1678.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ryan, L., Sales, R., Tilki, M., & Siara, B. (2008). Social networks, social support and social capital: The experiences of recent Polish migrants in London. Sociology, 42(4), 672–690.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tonkens, E. (2012). Working with Arlie Hochschild: Connecting feelings to social change. Social Politics, 19(2), 194–218. https://doi.org/10.1093/sp/jxs003

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Bochove, M. (2012). Geographies of belonging: The transnational and local involvement of economically successful migrants. Dissertation. Erasmus University, Rotterdam.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Bochove, M., & Zur Kleinsmiede, D. (2020). Broadening the scope of live-in migrant care research: How care networks shape the experience of precarious work. Health and Social Care in the Community, 28(1), 51–59.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Bochove, M., Zur Kleinsmiede, D., & Ashu, S. (2017). Kwetsbaar, en dan? Hoe inwonende buitenlandse zorgverleners en hun werkgevers omgaan met precaire arbeid. Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Bochove, M., Tonkens, E., Verplanke, L., & Roggeveen, S. (2018). Reconstructing the professional domain: Boundary work of professionals and volunteers in the context of social service reform. Current Sociology, 66(3), 392–411.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van den Broek, T., Dykstra, P. A., & Van Der Veen, R. J. (2019). Adult children stepping in? Long-term care reforms and trends in children’s provision of household support to impaired parents in the Netherlands. Ageing & Society, 39(1), 112–137.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Dijk, H. M., Cramm, J. M., & Nieboer, A. P. (2013). The experiences of neighbour, volunteer and professional support-givers in supporting community dwelling older people. Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(2), 150–158.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Grafhorst, A. (2014). Verantwoorde buitenlandse zorg aan huis: Een verkennend onderzoek naar inwonende buitenlandse zorgverleners in Nederland. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Stichting Wemos.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wee, K., Goh, C., & Yeoh, B. S. (2019). Chutes-and-ladders: The migration industry, conditionality, and the production of precarity among migrant domestic workers in Singapore. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 45(14), 2672–2688.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, W. J., & Chaddha, A. (2009). The role of theory in ethnographic research. Ethnography, 10(4), 549–564.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Marianne van Bochove .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2021 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

van Bochove, M., zur Kleinsmiede, D. (2021). Social Support Within and Outside Care Networks: Experiences of Live-in Migrant Care Workers in the Netherlands. In: Horn, V., Schweppe, C., Böcker, A., Bruquetas-Callejo, M. (eds) The Global Old Age Care Industry. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-2237-3_12

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-2237-3_12

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-16-2236-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-16-2237-3

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)