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Conversion of Proprietary 3D Printer for Open-Source Utilization

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS,volume 217)

Abstract

The open-source movement has shifted consumer’s choice of preference from proprietary 3D printers to the assembly and utilization of open-source 3D printers. This paper presents a project procedure plan to be applied in the conversion of a discontinued and phased-out proprietary 3D printer for open-source function, compatibility and utilization. An assessment of the subject machine to be converted highlights the obsolescence of its default firmware and the exclusivity feature of its microcontroller that limits the use of cost-effective third-party 3D printing filaments. Necessary replacements in terms of hardware, firmware and software were conducted to ensure that the 3D printer can facilitate the processing of generic consumables while at the same time producing an acceptable quality of outputs. Results of the conversion procedure exhibit success in converting a proprietary 3D printer for open-source utilization by conducting performance evaluation among its 3D-printed outputs. The processes and results presented in this study clearly show the viability of converting a proprietary 3D printer into an open-source 3D printer that optimizes modularity and cost-effectiveness.

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • Open-source 3D printers
  • Open-source machine conversion

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the support of the Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology (MSUIIT) Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension for their assistance in this study. This work is supported by MSU-IIT as an internally funded research for FAB LAB Mindanao.

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Correspondence to Edison Montes .

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Montes, E., Lasmarias, G., Escanilla, E., Velasco, L. (2022). Conversion of Proprietary 3D Printer for Open-Source Utilization. In: Yang, XS., Sherratt, S., Dey, N., Joshi, A. (eds) Proceedings of Sixth International Congress on Information and Communication Technology. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 217. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-2102-4_32

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