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Chapter on Testosterone Therapy

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Abstract

Testosterone is thought of as male hormone. However it is critically important for women as well. Testosterone or androgens are released from two locations in the female body. 80% of testosterone is created by the ovary and 20% is released by the adrenal gland. It is not valued as much as it should be by the medical community. The most critical factor is that there is not an accepted normal range of testosterone in women worldwide. The impact of testosterone on women tends to improve muscle growth and diminish fat. It also helps with mood and a sense of well-being. It is critical in libido, sexual sensation and response. As a woman goes through life this is critical. The impact on social interaction is greatly underestimated. Replacement of testosterone in women has been used for over 30 years. The methods used to replace testosterone have varied from oral synthetic forms to bio identical forms that come in topical gels, injections, troches, and pellets. The history and development of these options will be explored in this chapter [1, 3].

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DeLucia, C. (2022). Chapter on Testosterone Therapy. In: Jindal, P., Malhotra, N., Joshi, S. (eds) Aesthetic and Regenerative Gynecology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1743-0_14

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