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The Swedish Vision Zero—An Advanced Safety Culture Phenomenon

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Transport and Safety

Abstract

Road traffic injuries have been recognized as a global public health problem by the United Nations in its 2030 Agenda. Sweden which has one of the safest road transport systems in the world has planned and implemented a policy which naturally flows from Swedish society and its safety culture. In October 1997, Sweden reached an important milestone when the Swedish Parliament adopted Vision Zero as their new long-term goal and strategy for road safety. How Swedish society has responded to this public health problem and how it has evolved over the years forms the subject matter of this presentation. Vision Zero as a policy innovation and how it influences both Sweden’s road safety strategies and the operational road safety work and its results will be a useful example to other countries and societies looking for a sustainable answer.

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Correspondence to Matts-Åke Belin .

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Belin, MÅ. (2021). The Swedish Vision Zero—An Advanced Safety Culture Phenomenon. In: Tiwari, G., Mohan, D. (eds) Transport and Safety. Springer Transactions in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1115-5_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1115-5_1

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