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Reproducing the Perception of Place: Case Study Example of the City of Nottingham, UK

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Abstract

The reproduction of the perception of place depends on three critical dimensions of behavioural, social, and perceptual. We use all three as the primary basis of this chapter’s research study. In doing so, we delve into what Chapin (1974) defines as the determinants of activity patterns, namely ‘propensity to engage in the activity’, and ‘opportunity to engage in the activity’.

We don’t want a plan based on land uses. We want a plan based on experiences. Who visits downtown to see land uses?

—Mitchell Silver

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Fig. 6.1

(Source Adapted from Google Earth Maps, 2019 map of Nottingham’s City Centre)

Fig. 6.2

(Source Author’s own)

Fig. 6.3

(Source Author’s own)

Fig. 6.4

(Source Adapted from Google Earth Maps, 2019 map of Nottingham’s City Centre)

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Correspondence to Ali Cheshmehzangi .

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Cheshmehzangi, A. (2021). Reproducing the Perception of Place: Case Study Example of the City of Nottingham, UK. In: Urban Memory in City Transitions. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1003-5_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1003-5_6

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