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The Significance of Place in Mind: Comprehending Memory Through Urban Places

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Abstract

The relationship between space, time, and memory is discernable in many urban design theories, many projects, and many urbanism initiatives. By integrating the three, we see how interacting systems are developed, primarily through spatial and temporal aspects of memory development and memory processing (Eichenbaum, 2017).

Cities are not only a place where we live but also a place where humanity evolves.

—Planners Realm

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Cheshmehzangi, A. (2021). The Significance of Place in Mind: Comprehending Memory Through Urban Places. In: Urban Memory in City Transitions. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-16-1003-5_3

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