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Carbon Nanotubes—Potential of Use for Deep Bioimaging

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Abstract

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a major over 1000-nm near-infrared fluorophore that enables in vivo deep imaging in the “second biological window.” Because of the unique properties with their tube-shaped morphology, the CNTs show extremely unique in vivo behaviors including the migration and retention in the organs and time-dependent change in the cellular uptake followed by intracellular distribution. This chapter reviews the in vivo deep imaging results using CNTs and unique in vivo behavior and biological effects of CNTs comparatively with their types with different properties. The information is important for future safe and further functional biomedical use of CNTs.

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Correspondence to Atsuto Onoda .

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Onoda, A., Umezawa, M. (2021). Carbon Nanotubes—Potential of Use for Deep Bioimaging. In: Soga, K., Umezawa, M., Okubo, K. (eds) Transparency in Biology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-9627-8_5

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