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Role of Cryptography in Network Security

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The "Essence" of Network Security: An End-to-End Panorama

Abstract

Network administrators employ several security mechanisms to protect data in the network from unauthorized access and various threats. The security mechanisms enhance the usability and integrity of the network. The design aspects of the network security mechanism involve both hardware and software technologies. The application domains of security mechanisms cover both public and private computer networks which are used in everyday jobs for conducting transactions and communications among business partners, government agencies, enterprises and individuals. The network security schemes vary depending on the types of the network, that is, public or private, wired or wireless. Data security includes encryption, tokenization, and key management practices in protecting data across all applications and platforms. The antivirus and antimalware software are also part of network security for protection from malware such as spyware, ransomware, trojans, worms, and viruses. Cryptography is an automated mathematical tool that plays a vital role in network security. It assures the confidentiality and integrity of data as well as provides authentication and non-repudiation to the users. This chapter primarily focuses on cryptography techniques and their role in preserving the network security. The cryptography technique consists of encryption and decryption algorithms. The encryption algorithms perform scrambling of ordinary text and generate an unreadable format for the third party known as ciphertext. The original data is restructured by the intended receiver using decryption algorithms. The cryptographic techniques are broadly classified into three categories namely symmetric-key cryptography, asymmetric-key cryptography and authentication. The cryptographic algorithms that are widely accepted are outlined with their relative advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, recent proficient cryptographic algorithms specific to cloud computing, wireless sensor networks and on-chip-networks are thoroughly discussed that provide a clear view about acquiring secure communication in the network using cryptography.

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Correspondence to Swagata Roy Chatterjee .

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Sarkar, A., Chatterjee, S.R., Chakraborty, M. (2021). Role of Cryptography in Network Security. In: Chakraborty, M., Singh, M., Balas, V.E., Mukhopadhyay, I. (eds) The "Essence" of Network Security: An End-to-End Panorama. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 163. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-9317-8_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-9317-8_5

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