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State Fragility and Human Security in Asia in the Context of Climate and Disaster Risks

Part of the Disaster Risk Reduction book series (DRR)

Abstract

Climate-fragility risks are on the rise globally and developmental paths taken by countries could be attributed to this rise. To understand the link between development and climate-fragility risks, this chapter presents the findings of the survey conducted by the authors with development practitioners and experts from Asia. The purpose of the survey was to elicit responses regarding the perceptions of stakeholders engaged in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation on climate-fragility risks, their understanding of the subject, and their opinion on how to address them. To explain differences in survey findings, the chapter also presents a Climate-Fragility Risk Index (CFRI) that provides a systematic analysis and presentation of various climate-fragility indicators. The survey indicated diverse views on what constitutes climate fragilities with clear differences between developed countries and developing countries. Majority of respondents opined that the climate-fragility risks are additional to disaster risks while others said that such risks emerge as a result of interaction between climate change and developmental pressure. Most respondents from Japan had a low understanding of climate-fragility risks (CFRs) at the policy level, while majority of responses from developing countries in Asia revealed a very low understanding on the subject at the policy level. Climate change as a major driver affects livelihoods, worsens disaster impacts, and leads to transboundary conflicts. Major challenges such as dysfunctional institutions and developmental deficit, including migration and internal displacement, are directly bearing upon the fragility risks of the developing countries. For developed countries such as Japan, demographic stress such as aging population is a significant factor to be addressed. As a way forward, this chapter advices the countries to formulate and implement well-coordinated and evidence-based policies in the increasingly integrating world with better investments in understanding drivers and pressures behind CFRs and better information sharing for well-informed decision-making.

Keywords

  • State fragility
  • Human security
  • Asia
  • Disaster risk reduction
  • Climate-fragility risk index

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Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful that part of this research was supported by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (2-1801) of the Environmental Restoration and Conservation Agency of Japan and IGES Strategic Research Fund 2018. Collaboration with Adelphi, Germany, is likewise acknowledged.

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Correspondence to S. V. R. K. Prabhakar .

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Prabhakar, S.V.R.K., Shaw, R. (2021). State Fragility and Human Security in Asia in the Context of Climate and Disaster Risks. In: Pulhin, J.M., Inoue, M., Shaw, R. (eds) Climate Change, Disaster Risks, and Human Security. Disaster Risk Reduction. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-8852-5_3

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