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Taro (Colocasia esculenta)

Abstract

Colocasia esculenta is a traditional, inter-developed, and a tuberous crop harvested across the globe in tropical and subtropical areas. It correlates to the “Arecaceae” own family and is also called the “taro,” the name was given to this family’s tubers and roots. It is grown mainly as an affluent source of starch for the use of its palatable corms and leaves as an edible vegetable. Historically, taro was used owing to its antitumor, antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal), antidiabetic, antihepatotoxic, and antimelanogenic characteristics. Recent studies have documented the presence in the taro of bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, steroids, β-sitosterol, etc., which are confirmed for their health benefits. In the twenty-first century, where the consumer demands natural ingredients integrating food products, taro has various potential for use in the food industry, but after investigating its medicinal and pharmaceutical properties. This analysis will shed light on taro’s bioactive and nutraceutical compounds and the possible health-promoting implications thereof.

Keywords

  • Colocasia esculenta
  • Antioxidants
  • Antimicrobial
  • Flavoniods
  • Health benefits

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Sharma, S., Jan, R., Kaur, R., Riar, C.S. (2020). Taro (Colocasia esculenta). In: Nayik, G.A., Gull, A. (eds) Antioxidants in Vegetables and Nuts - Properties and Health Benefits. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7470-2_18

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