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Creative Base Design: A New Form of Self-Expression in Competitive Games

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Part of the Digital Culture and Humanities book series (DICUHU,volume 3)

Abstract

As part of everyday life, mobile phones allow gamers to play online games wherever and whenever they wish. Since the first generation of smartphones, many of the most popular applications have been mobile games, with base defence games among the favourites, particularly with the implementation of real-time Player vs. Player (PvP) features. To protect their bases, gamers must not only strategically place their defence weapons in the base to guard against unpredictable attack and looting, but also launch attacks to loot others’ bases for upgrades. Each base houses necessities collected from lootings and upgrades, and also provides a personal space for the individual gamer’s creative expression and visual statement. Although strategic base creation is part of the core gameplay, the creative design of the base is not. Between 2013 and 2018, the game Clash of Clans (COC) has inspired many creative designs shared on social media by creators and fans, on both official and unofficial game forums. This mobile game has not only stood the test of time commercially as one of the most popular mobile games in the global market, but has also created an unprecedented participatory phenomenon of personal digital art, including designs specifically meant to celebrate Chinese culture, in mobile gaming and social media. This chapter examines this participatory phenomenon, focusing on the visual styles and content of these creative, and sometimes even offensive or obscene, visual expressions in social media. It also discusses the role of social media in facilitating this unique gamer-created phenomenon.

Keywords

  • Mobile gaming
  • Base design
  • Fan creativity
  • Online communities
  • Participatory culture
  • Participatory art of creation
  • Pixel art
  • Isometric art

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Correspondence to David Kei-man Yip .

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Yip, D.Km. (2020). Creative Base Design: A New Form of Self-Expression in Competitive Games. In: Lam, S.Sk. (eds) New Media Spectacles and Multimodal Creativity in a Globalised Asia . Digital Culture and Humanities, vol 3. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7341-5_9

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