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Abstract

Marine fisheries sector contributes significantly to the national economy. Marine fisheries production is through capture of fisheries and mariculture farming of marine resources in sea. Mariculture technologies like seaweed farming and marine ornamental fish culture are fisherwomen-friendly technologies. Seaweed farming is being carried out with Kappaphycus alvarezii, a red algae, which yields carrageenan, a commercially important polysaccharide, used as a raw material in food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and mining industry. The farming is being carried out as family-based model. Majority of fisherwomen are involved in farming activities such as seeding, tying the seeded rope on the raft, floating, and maintenance of rafts. The culture period is 45 days. A total of 4–5 cycles can be harvested in a year. On an average, a family earns from ₹10,000 to ₹15,000/per month through seaweed farming. The farming is being adopted for more than 10 years in Tamil Nadu. The major positive impact of seaweed farming includes improved economic empowerment and decision-making ability of fisherwomen. Moreover, seaweeds can significantly mitigate the adverse impact of climate change and will earn carbon credits to our country. Similarly, the marine ornamental seed rearing is a less time-consuming and more revenue-generating activity for fisherwomen Around 500 numbers of half-inch-sized clown fishes are supplied from Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), Mandapam, and the fisherwomen group of 2–3 members grow them up to 1.5 inches in size in 45–60 days and market them. Hence, one cycle is for 45 days. A total of five cycles are carried out in a year. On an average, a member earns around ₹10,000/per month. Apart from economic empowerment, the marine ornamental fish seed production paves a way for hatchery-produced ornamental fish trade and reduces the pressure on wild collection and abandoning of destructive collection methods.

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Acknowledgment

The authors are thankful to the Director, CMFRI, for his encouragement, guidance and support.

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Johnson, B. et al. (2021). Empowerment of Fisherwomen Through Marine Farming. In: Venkatramanan, V., Shah, S., Prasad, R. (eds) Exploring Synergies and Trade-offs between Climate Change and the Sustainable Development Goals . Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7301-9_15

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