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The Coalescence of the LGBTQI+ Neo-Tribes During the Pride Events

Abstract

Pride events have transformed from being protests to becoming celebrations of diversity. As a social phenomenon, such events represent the collective interests of the LGBTQI+ communities and the individual agendas of the gender and sexually diverse groups that are part of the LGBTQI+ acronym. This chapter examines pride events by applying a neo-tribal theory perspective based on the four characteristics of neo-tribes being: fluidity in membership; shared sentiment; rituals and symbols; and space. It is argued that while the LGBTQI+ communities together represent a neo-tribe with a unified purpose, the individual communities form sub-tribes and provide a unique interpretation based on their sexual and gender identity. Using a participant observation approach, this chapter presents a discussion on the interplay between sub-tribes and the overall neo-tribe that coalesce together to construct a pride event, its holistic message and the experiences therein.

Keywords

  • Neo-tribal theory
  • LGBTQI+
  • Pride
  • Neo-tribes
  • Sub-tribes
  • Participant observation

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Fig. 6.1

(Reproduced from Vorobjovas-Pinta 2017)

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Acknowledgments

Parts of this chapter appeared in Gay neo-tribes: an exploration of space and travel behaviour (Doctoral dissertation) by Oskaras Vorobjovas-Pinta, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay, Australia, 2017.

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Correspondence to Oscar Vorobjovas-Pinta .

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Vorobjovas-Pinta, O., Lewis, C. (2021). The Coalescence of the LGBTQI+ Neo-Tribes During the Pride Events. In: Pforr, C., Dowling, R., Volgger, M. (eds) Consumer Tribes in Tourism. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7150-3_6

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