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Black Travel Tribes: An Exploration of Race and Travel in America

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Abstract

This chapter examines race and leisure travel in America. It explores the impacts of racial inequality, segregation and discrimination on the travel industry. This work aims to examine how the history of Black Travel has led to the existence of Black Travel Tribes. It will also describe the nature of the tribes, why they exist, and what they hope to accomplish for Black travellers around the world. The chapter will begin chronicling the impacts of slavery and segregation on Black Travel, followed by an exploration of Black Travel Tribes, their shared identities and collective mechanisms, concluding with a discussion on growth opportunities and challenges facing the tourism industry regarding Black Travel Tribes.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-15-7150-3_4
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Fig. 4.1
Fig. 4.2

(Reproduced from Nomadness Travel Tribe 2019)

Fig. 4.3
Fig. 4.4

Notes

  1. 1.

    The word ‘Black’ is used throughout the paper to describe people of the African diaspora. ‘Black’ is a political identity that acknowledges an understanding of shared experiences of injustice, by extension of this identity, APA, MLA, AP and other format styles have slowly embraced the respect that should be given to various racial and ethnic groups and how they wish to be labeled. Thus, any mention of those groups ought to reflect this respect and distinction through the capitalization of their group name (i.e. Black, White, African-American, Latinx, Syrian, or Lakota). Adopted from Dillette et al. (2018).

  2. 2.

    The ‘Jim Crow Era’ recalls the time when racial segregation was legal in the United States of America between 1877 and 1965. Laws included the enforcement of racial segregation in public facilities such as transportation, housing, education, restrooms, hotels, restaurants, drinking fountains etc.

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Correspondence to Alana K. Dillette .

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Dillette, A.K. (2021). Black Travel Tribes: An Exploration of Race and Travel in America. In: Pforr, C., Dowling, R., Volgger, M. (eds) Consumer Tribes in Tourism. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7150-3_4

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