Skip to main content

Music and Coding as an Approach to a Broad-Based Computational Literacy

  • 282 Accesses

Part of the Lecture Notes in Educational Technology book series (LNET)

Abstract

This chapter takes up two questions related to science learning in the twenty-first century. How do we develop broad-based computational literacy skills for the next generation of learners? And, how do we do that in a way that engages diverse learners whose voices have been historically marginalized in computing fields? To think about these questions, we provide a case study of student learning around music and coding in the context of a middle school summer camp. We reflect on the process through which multiple literacies (music as a literacy and computational literacy) shape student learning, creative expression, and engagement. We propose that developing computational literacy skills for the purposes of science might best be accomplished through a long-term, multidisciplinary approach in which students engage in many kinds of activities for diverse purposes, including that of personal creative expression. Music, in turn, provides a particularly rich context through which to explore concepts of computer programming.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-15-6747-6_5
  • Chapter length: 15 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   129.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-15-6747-6
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 5.1
Fig. 5.2
Fig. 5.3
Fig. 5.4

Notes

  1. 1.

    https://home.cc.gatech.edu/ice-gt/597.

  2. 2.

    This work is supported by the National Science Foundation grants 1612619, 1451762, and 1837661. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

References

  • Aaron S., & Blackwell, A. F. (2013). From Sonic Pi to Overtone: creative musical experiences with domain-specific and functional languages. In Proceedings of the First ACM SIGPLAN Workshop on Functional Art, Music, Modeling & Design (pp. 35–46). ACM.

    Google Scholar 

  • Abbott, B. P., Abbott, R., Abbott, T. D., Abernathy, M. R., Acernese, F., Ackley, K., et al. (2016). Observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. Physical Review Letters, 116(6), 061102.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bamberger, J. (2013). Discovering the musical mind: A view of creativity as learning. Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bamberger, J., & diSessa, A. (2003). Music as Embodied Mathematics: A study of mutually informing affinity. International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning, 8, 123–160.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bau, D., Dawson, M., & Bau, A. (2015). Using pencil code to bridge the gap between visual and text-based coding. In Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (p. 706). ACM.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brennan, K., & Resnick, M. (2012, April). New frameworks for studying and assessing the development of computational thinking. In Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Vol. 1, p. 25). Vancouver, Canada.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chiang, T. (2019). Exhalation. Pan Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • diSessa, A. A. (2018). Computational literacy and “the big picture” concerning computers in mathematics education. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 20(1), 3–31.

    Google Scholar 

  • Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration. (2019). First M87 event horizon telescope results. I. The shadow of the supermassive black hole. arXiv preprint arXiv:1906.11238.

    Google Scholar 

  • Freeman, J., Magerko, B., Edwards, D., Mcklin, T., Lee, T., & Moore, R. (2019). EarSketch: Engaging broad populations in computing through music. Communication ACM 62(9), 78–85.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grover, S., & Pea, R. (2013). Computational thinking in K–12: A review of the state of the field. Educational Researcher, 42(1), 38–43.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. (2001). Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome. Nature, 409(6822), 860.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kafai, Y. B. (2016). From computational thinking to computational participation in K–12 education. Communication ACM, 59(8), 26–27.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kafai, Y. B., & Burke, Q. (2013, March). The social turn in K-12 programming: moving from computational thinking to computational participation. In Proceeding of the 44th ACM technical symposium on computer science education (pp. 603–608).

    Google Scholar 

  • Kluyver, T., Ragan-Kelley, B., Pérez, F., Granger, B, Bussonnier, M., Frederic, J et al. (2016). Positioning and power in Academic Publishing: Players, agents, and agendas. Chapter Jupyter Notebooks—A publishing format for reproducible computational workflows (pp. 87–90). IOS Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Kohn, W. (2003). Nobel lectures, chemistry 1996–2000 (p. 213). World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore.

    Google Scholar 

  • Magerko, B., Freeman, J., Mcklin, T, Reilly, M., Livingston, E., Mccoid, S., & Crews-Brown, A. (2016). Earsketch: A steam-based approach for underrepresented populations in high school computer science education. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE), 16(4), 14.

    Google Scholar 

  • Manaris, B, Stevens, B, Brown, A. R. (2016). JythonMusic: An environment for teaching algorithmic music composition, dynamic coding and musical performativity. Journal of Music, Technology & Education, 9(1), 33–56.

    Google Scholar 

  • Margolis, J. (2010). Stuck in the shallow end: Education, race, and computing. MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papert, S. (1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. Basic Books, Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pople, J. (2003). Nobel lectures, chemistry 1996–2000 (p. 246). World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore.

    Google Scholar 

  • Resnick, M., Maloney, J., Monroy-Hernández, A., Rusk, N., Eastmond, E., Brennan, K., et al. (2009). Scratch: Programming for all. Communication ACM, 52(11), 60–67.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shute, V. J., Sun, C., & Asbell-Clarke, J. (2017). Demystifying computational thinking. Educational Research Review, 22(2017), 142–158.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vee, A. (2017). Coding literacy: How computer programming is changing writing. MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weintrop, D., Beheshti, E., Horn, M., Orton, K., Jona, K., Trouille, L., & Wilensky, U. (2016). Defining computational thinking for mathematics and science classrooms. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 25(1), 127–147.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wilensky, U, & Papert, S. (2010). Restructurations: Reformulations of knowledge disciplines through new representational forms. Constructionism 2010.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wing, J. M. (2006). Computational thinking. Communication ACM, 49(3), 33–35.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zweben, S., & Bizot, B. (2018). 2017 CRA Taulbee Survey. Computing Research News, 30(5), 1–47.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Brian Magerko and Jason Freeman from Georgia Institute of Technology, and Nichole Pinkard and Amy Pratt from Northwestern University. We also gratefully acknowledge Cortez Watson, Brian Andrus, Izaiah Wallace, and all of the participants in our summer camp. This research was supported by grants DRL-1612619, DRL-1837661, and DRL‐1451762 from the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michael S. Horn .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Horn, M.S., Banerjee, A., West, M. (2020). Music and Coding as an Approach to a Broad-Based Computational Literacy. In: Giannakos, M. (eds) Non-Formal and Informal Science Learning in the ICT Era. Lecture Notes in Educational Technology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6747-6_5

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6747-6_5

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-15-6746-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-15-6747-6

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)