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Voice Attractiveness: Concepts, Methods, and Data

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Voice Attractiveness

Abstract

This book comprises contributions on vocal aspects of attractiveness, social likability, and charisma. Despite some apparent distinct characteristics of these three concepts, there are not only similarities, but even interdependencies to be considered. This chapter introduces and regards the concepts studied, methods applied, and material selected in the contributions. Based on this structured summary, we argue to increase interdisciplinary and even holistic efforts in order to better understand the concepts for voice and speech in humans and machines.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Signals are traits that have evolved specifically because they change the behavior of receivers in ways that benefit the signaler. For example, peacock resplendent tail feathers are honest since they truly signal reproductive fitness of their bearer to the receiver.

  2. 2.

    The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is the dimensionless ratio of the circumference of the waist to that of the hip. WHR correlates with health and fertility (with different optimal values in males and females).

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Trouvain, J., Weiss, B., Barkat-Defradas, M. (2021). Voice Attractiveness: Concepts, Methods, and Data. In: Weiss, B., Trouvain, J., Barkat-Defradas, M., Ohala, J.J. (eds) Voice Attractiveness. Prosody, Phonology and Phonetics. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6627-1_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6627-1_1

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  • Online ISBN: 978-981-15-6627-1

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