Skip to main content
  • 127 Accesses

Abstract

This chapter explores the relationships between new immigrants and food in four parts. In the first I discuss some of the scholarship on the importance of food in creating a complex sense of ‘home’ for immigrants in their new homes. Next, I introduce the contemporary food culture of Vermont and how newcomers (refugees and migrant farmworkers in particular) might fit within it. In the third part of the chapter, I examine in greater detail the (re)emergence of ethnic grocery stores and restaurants in refugee neighborhoods in Vermont. In the final part of this chapter, I look at an innovative refugee agriculture program in Vermont meant to provide access to land and the ability to grow culturally significant crops for newcomers.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 99.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 99.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

References

  • Alibhai-Brown, Yasmin. 2009. The settler’s cookbook: A memoir of love, migration and food. London: Granta UK.

    Google Scholar 

  • Alkon, Alison, and Christie McCullen. 2011. Whiteness and farmers markets: Performances, perpetuations… contestations? Antipode 43 (4): 937–959.

    Google Scholar 

  • Blake, Megan. 2018. Building an unjust foodscape: Shifting governance regimes, urban place making and the making of Chinese food as ordinary in Hong Kong. Local Environment 23 (11): 1047–1062.

    Google Scholar 

  • Camps-Calvet, Marta, Johannes Langemeyer, Laura Calvet-Mir, and Erik Gómez-Baggethun. 2016. Ecosystem services provided by urban gardens in Barcelona, Spain: Insights for policy and planning. Environmental Science & Policy 62: 14–23.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clendenning, Jessica, Wolfram Dressler, and Carol Richards. 2016. Food justice or food sovereignty? Understanding the rise of urban food movements in the USA. Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1): 165–177.

    Google Scholar 

  • Conner, David, Hannah Harrington, Sarah Heiss, and Linda Berlin. 2019. How can food hubs best serve their buyers? Perspectives from Vermont. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition 1: 1–15.

    Google Scholar 

  • Conway, Tenley. 2016. Home-based edible gardening: Urban residents’ motivations and barriers. Cities and the Environment (CATE) 9 (1): 3–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Conway, Meghan. 2018. Success of food assistance programs: Metrics to evaluate provision of healthy food products across Burlington, Vermont. BA Honors Thesis. Environmental Studies, University of Vermont.

    Google Scholar 

  • Counihan, Carole, and Penny Van Esterik. 2012. Food and culture: A reader, 3rd ed. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Diner, Hasia. 2009. Hungering for America: Italian, Irish, and Jewish foodways in the age of migration, 3rd ed. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Etzold, Benjamin. 2016. Migration, informal labour and (trans) local productions of urban space–the case of Dhaka’s street food vendors. Population, Space and Place 22 (2): 170–184.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fernández-Armesto, Felipe. 2002. Near a thousand tables: A history of food. New York: Simon & Schuster.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gabaccia, Donna. 2000. We are what we eat: Ethnic food and the making of Americans. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gange, Jared. 2019. Suddenly you are nobody: Vermont refugees tell their stories. Huntington, Vermont: Burlington Graphics.

    Google Scholar 

  • Guthman, Julie. 2008. If they only knew: Color blindness and universalism in California alternative food institutions. The Professional Geographer 60 (3): 387–397.

    Google Scholar 

  • Han, Guang. 2018. From farm to Canal Street, Chinatown’s alternative food network in the global marketplace. Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4): 905–906.

    Google Scholar 

  • Horst, Megan, Nathan McClintock, and Lesli Hoey. 2017. The intersection of planning, urban agriculture, and food justice: A review of the literature. Journal of the American Planning Association 83 (3): 277–295.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jung, Yuson, and Andrew Newman. 2014. An edible moral economy in the motor city: Food politics and urban governance in Detroit. Gastronomica: the Journal of Critical Food Studies 14 (1): 23–32.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kato, Yuki, Scarlett Andrews, and Cate Irvin. 2018. Availability and accessibility of vacant lots for urban cultivation in post-Katrina New Orleans. Urban Affairs Review 54 (2): 322–362.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kershen, Anne (ed.). 2017. Food in the migrant experience. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Khojasteh, Maryam, and Samina Raja. 2017. Agents of change: How immigrant-run ethnic food retailers improve food environments. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition. 12 (3): 299–327.

    Google Scholar 

  • King, Anthony. 2004. Spaces of global culture: Architecture, urbanism, modernity. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koc, Mustafa, and Jennifer Welsh. 2001. Food, foodways and immigrant experience. Toronto: Centre for Studies in Food Security.

    Google Scholar 

  • Li, Wei. 2009. Ethnoburb: The new ethnic community in urban America. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mannur, Anita. 2005. Model minorities can cook: Fusion cuisine in Asian America. In East Main Street: Asian American popular culture, ed. Shilpa Davé, Leilani Nishime, and Tash Oren. New York: NYU Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mannur, Anita. 2010. Culinary fictions: Food in South Asian diasporic culture. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mares, Teresa. 2019. Life on the other border: Farmworkers and food justice in Vermont. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mares, Teresa, Naomi Wolcott-MacCausland, Julia Doucet, Andy Kolovos, and Marek Bennett. 2020. Using chiles and comics to address the physical and emotional wellbeing of farmworkers in Vermont’s borderlands. Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1): 197–208.

    Google Scholar 

  • Matt, Susan. 2007. A hunger for home: Homesickness and food in a global consumer society. Journal of American Culture 30 (1): 6–17.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moffat, Tina, Charlene Mohammed, and Bruce Newbold. 2017. Cultural dimensions of food insecurity among immigrants and refugees. Human Organization 76 (1): 15–27.

    Google Scholar 

  • NFNA. 2015. New Farms for New Americans annual report. Burlington: Association of Africans Living in Vermont.

    Google Scholar 

  • NFNA. 2020. New Farms for New Americans annual report. Burlington: Association of Africans Living in Vermont.

    Google Scholar 

  • ORR. 2020. Refugee Agricultural Partnership Project. Office of Refugee Resettlement, Agency of Health and Human Services, Government of the United States. Available from https://www.acf.hhs.gov/orr/programs/rapp.

  • Parker, Barbara, Jennifer Brady, Elaine Power, and Susan Belyea (eds.). 2019. Feminist food studies: Intersectional perspectives. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Radel, Claudia, Birgit Schmook, and Susannah McCandless. 2010. Environment, transnational labor migration, and gender: Case studies from southern Yucatan, Mexico and Vermont, USA. Population and Environment 32 (2–3): 177–197.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ray, Krishnendu. 2004. The migrant’s table: Meals and memories in Bengali-American households. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reynolds, Kristin. 2017. Designing urban agriculture education for social justice: Radical innovation through Farm School NYC. International Journal of Food Design 2 (1): 45–63.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rosenfeld, Stuart. 2010. Sustainable food systems cluster, Vermont style. European Planning Studies 18 (11): 1897–1908.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sarkar, Sucharita. 2019. Food, memory and everyday transnationalism in Chitrita Banerji’s culinary memoirs. Post Scriptum: an Interdisciplinary Journal of Literary Studies 4 (2): 232–247.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scanlon, Paul. 2010. Cuisine as an agent of acculturation: Mexican-American cultural and culinary incorporation and acceptance. PhD Dissertation. Anthropology, University of Georgia.

    Google Scholar 

  • Slocum, Rachel. 2007. Whiteness, space and alternative food practice. Geoforum 38 (3): 520–533.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, Bobby. 2019. Food justice, intersectional agriculture, and the triple food movement. Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4): 825–835.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stokes, Hannah. 2017. Conceptualizing and measuring food security among resettled refugees living in the United States. MS Thesis. Food Systems, University of Vermont.

    Google Scholar 

  • Szanto, David. 2015. Performing gastronomy: An ecosophic engagement with the liveliness of food. PhD Dissertation. Fine Arts, Concordia University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, Julie. 2016. 9 ways Vermont’s food scene is impossible to beat. Huffington Post. August 3. Available from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/vermont-food-the-best_n_57a08c6ce4b08a8e8b5f453c.

  • Vanderbeck, Robert M. 2006. Vemont and the imaginative geographies of American Whiteness. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 96 (3): 641–659.

    Google Scholar 

  • VLT. 2020. Pine Island Community Farm. Vermont Land Trust. Available from https://www.vlt.org/pineisland.

  • Walker, Samuel. 2016. Urban agriculture and the sustainability fix in Vancouver and Detroit. Urban Geography 37 (2): 163–182.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Pablo S. Bose .

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Bose, P.S. (2020). Food. In: Refugees in New Destinations and Small Cities. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6386-7_8

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-6386-7_8

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-15-6385-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-15-6386-7

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics