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Shared Prosperity and Universalisation of Secondary Education

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Abstract

The central role of the manufacturing sector in the context of rapid economic growth and catching up of the Indian economy has been debated in relation to the surge of the service sector.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In this new literature, however, industrial policy is more selective than in the past and committed to boost competitive firms in industries with comparative advantages only (see also Mitra and Tsujita 2016 for some elements on the literature on the New Industrial Policy).

  2. 2.

    As summarised by Narayan and Petesch (2012).

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Mitra, A. (2020). Shared Prosperity and Universalisation of Secondary Education. In: Tilak, J. (eds) Universal Secondary Education in India. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-5366-0_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-5366-0_16

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