Skip to main content

The Evolution of Educational Game Designs From Computers to Mobile Devices: A Comprehensive Review

Part of the Lecture Notes in Educational Technology book series (LNET)

Abstract

With the rapid growth of mobile technologies, mobile devices have become very popular and have reached a very high spread. Consequently, mobile games have started gaining an increasing attention from researchers and practitioners. This paper investigates the impact of mobile technologies on designing and delivering educational mobile games. In particular, it investigates the evolution of educational games design from being used on computers to being used on mobile devices. To do so, forty studies regarding computer and mobile educational games are reviewed. The obtained results showed that: (1) computer and mobile educational games still share some game design elements. (2) the new embedded mobile devices’ technologies made educational mobile games more immersive and fun. (3) a set of game design recommendations regarding designing mobile educational games which researchers and practitioners can refer to in their context.

Keywords

  • Game design
  • Mobile technologies
  • Computer educational games
  • Mobile educational games

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-15-4952-6_6
  • Chapter length: 19 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-15-4952-6
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   179.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 6.1

References

  • Akkerman, S., Admiraal, W., & Huizenga, J. (2009). Storification in history education: A mobile game in and about medieval Amsterdam. Computers & Education, 52(2), 449–459.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Amory, A., & Seagram, R. (2003). Educational game models: Conceptualization and evaluation. South African Journal of Higher Education,17(2): 206–217.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anderson, E. F., McLoughlin, L., Liarokapis, F., Peters, C., Petridis, P., & de Freitas, S. (2010). Developing serious games for cultural heritage: A state-of-the-art review. Virtual Reality, 14(4), 255–275.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Arnab, S., Brown, K., Clarke, S., Dunwell, I., Lim, T., Suttie, N., et al. (2013). The development approach of a pedagogically-driven serious game to support relationship and sex education (RSE) within a classroom setting. Computers & Education, 69, 15–30.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Beavis, C., Muspratt, S., & Thompson, R. (2015). ‘Computer games can get your brain working’: Student experience and perceptions of digital games in the classroom. Learning, media and technology, 40(1), 21–42.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Beserra, V., Nussbaum, M., Zeni, R., Rodriguez, W., & Wurman, G. (2014). Practising arithmetic using educational video games with an interpersonal computer. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 17(3), 343–358.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bressler, D. M., & Bodzin, A. M. (2013). A mixed methods assessment of students’ flow experiences during a mobile augmented reality science game. Journal of Computer Assisted learning, 29(6), 505–517.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brown, E., & Cairns, P. (2004). A grounded investigation of game immersion. In CHI’04 extended abstracts on human factors in computing systems (pp. 1297–1300).

    Google Scholar 

  • Carbonaro, M., Cutumisu, M., Duff, H., Gillis, S., Onuczko, C., Schaeffer, J., et al. (2006). Adapting a commercial role-playing game for educational computer game production. Game on North America, 54–61, 4.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chen, C. P., Shih, J. L., & Ma, Y. C. (2014). Using instructional pervasive game for school children’s cultural learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 17(2), 169–182.

    Google Scholar 

  • Churchill, D. (2011). Conceptual model learning objects and design recommendations for small screens. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 14(1), 203–216.

    Google Scholar 

  • Churchill, D., & Hedberg, J. (2008). Learning object design considerations for small-screen handheld devices. Computers & Education, 881–893.

    Google Scholar 

  • Conati, C. (2002). Probabilistic assessment of user’s emotions in educational games. Applied Artificial Intelligence, 16(7–8), 555–575.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Daschmann, E. C., Goetz, T., & Stupnisky, R. H. (2011). Testing the predictors of boredom at school: Development and validation of the precursors to boredom scales. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 421–440.

    Google Scholar 

  • Demirbilek, M. (2010). Investigating attitudes of adult educators towards educational mobile media and games in eight European countries. Journal of Information Technology Education: Research, 235–247, 33.

    Google Scholar 

  • Egenfeldt‐Nielsen, S. (2005). Beyond edutainment. Exploring the educational potential of computer games Ph.D. thesis, IT‐University of Copenhagen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Entertainment Software Association. (2014). http://www.theesa.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/ESA-2014-Annual-Report.pdf.

  • Fotouhi-Ghazvini, F., Earnshaw, R. A., Robison, D., & Excell, P. S. (2009). The MOBO City: A mobile game package for technical language learning, 19–24.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fotouhi-Ghazvini, F., Earnshaw, R. A., Robison, D., Moeini, A., & Excell, P. S. (2011). User interface design within a mobile educational game. In International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Furió, D., González-Gancedo, S., Juan, M., Seguí, I., & Costa, M. (2013a). The effects of the size and weight of a mobile device on an educational game. Computers & Education, 24–41.

    Google Scholar 

  • Furió, D., GonzáLez-Gancedo, S., Juan, M. C., Seguí, I., & Rando, N. (2013b). Evaluation of learning outcomes using an educational iPhone game versus traditional game. Computers & Education, 64, 1–23.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • George, S., & Serna, A. (2011). Introducing mobility in serious games: Enhancing situated and collaborative learning. Human-Computer Interaction. Users and Applications, 12–20.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goh, T. T., & Hooper, V. (2007). To TxT or not to TxT: That’s the puzzle. Journal of Information Technology Education: Research, 441–453.

    Google Scholar 

  • Göth, C., Frohberg, D., & Schwabe, G. (2006). The focus problem in mobile learning. In Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, pp. 153–160.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hashemi, M., Azizinezhad, M., Najafi, V., & Nesari, A. J. (2011). What is mobile learning? Challenges and capabilities. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 30, 2477–2481.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hou, H. T. (2012). Exploring the behavioral patterns of learners in an educational massively multiple online role-playing game. Computers & Education, 58(4), 1225–1233.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hwang, W. Y., Shih, T. K., Yeh, S. C., Chou, K. C., Ma, Z. H., & Sommool, W. (2014). Recognition-based physical response to facilitate EFL learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 17(4), 432–445.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jesse Freeman. (2014). https://developer.amazon.com/public/community/post/Tx21NJD7LRR0UEB/Responsive-Game-Design-Making-Games-that-Scale-Across-Desktop-Mobile-and-TV.

  • Jong, B. S., Lai, C. H., Hsia, Y. T., Lin, T. W., & Lu, C. Y. (2013). Using game-based cooperative learning to improve learning motivation: A study of online game use in an operating systems course. Transactions on Education, 56(2), 183–190.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Katmada, A., Mavridis, A., & Tsiatsos, T. (2014). Implementing a game for supporting learning in mathematics. The Electronic Journal of e-Learning, 12(3), 230–242.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kavakli, M., & Thorne, J. R. (2002). A usability study of input devices on measuring user performance in computer games. In International Conference on Information Technology and Applications (pp. 291–295).

    Google Scholar 

  • Kim, J. M., Hill, Jr., R. W., Durlach, P. J., Lane, H. C., Forbell, E., Core, M. & Hart, J. (2009). BiLAT: A game-based environment for practicing negotiation in a cultural context. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, 19(3), 289–308.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kim, P., Buckner, E., Kim, H., Makany, T., Taleja, N., & Parikh, V. (2012). A comparative analysis of a game-based mobile learning model in low-socioeconomic communities of India. International Journal of Educational Development, 32(2), 329–340.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kinshuk, Huang, H.-W., Sampson, D., & Chen, N. S. (2013). Trends in educational technology through the lens of the highly cited articles published in the journal of educational technology and society. 16(2), 3–20.

    Google Scholar 

  • Klopfer, E., Osterweil, S., & Salen, K. (2009). Moving learning games forward: Obstacles, opportunities and openness. Cambridge, MA: The Education Arcade, Massachuesetts Institute of Technology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koster, R. (2004). Theory of fun for game design. Paraglyph.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koutromanos, G., & Avraamidou, L. (2014). The use of mobile games in formal and informal learning environments: a review of the literature. Educational Media International, 51(1), 49–65.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kumar, A. N., & Lichack, C. (1997). Pedagogical dimensions and the evaluation of multimedia courseware for computer science. In 27th Annual Conference on Frontiers in Education Conference, 1997. Teaching and Learning in an Era of Change (Vol. 2, pp. 923–930).

    Google Scholar 

  • Lavin-Mera, P., Torrente, J., Moreno-Ger, P., Vallejo-Pinto, J., & Fernández-Manjón, B. (2009) Mobile game development for multiple devices in education. International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning, 19–26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Liao, C. C. Y., Chen, Z. H., Cheng, H. N. H., Chen, F. C., & Chan, T. W. (2011). My-Mini-Pet: A handheld pet-nurturing game to engage students in arithmetic practices. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27, 76–89.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lim, K. Y. T., & Wang, J. Y. Z. (2005). Collaborative handheld gaming in education. Educational Media International, 42, 351–359.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Litayem, N., Dhupia, B., & Rubab, S. (2015). Review of cross-platforms for mobile learning application development. International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications, 6(1).

    Google Scholar 

  • Liu, T. Y., & Chu, Y. L. (2010). Using ubiquitous games in an English listening and speaking course: Impact on learning outcomes and motivation. Computers & Education, 55(2), 630–643.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Liu, T. Y., Tan, T. H., & Chu, Y. L. (2009). Outdoor natural science learning with an RFID-supported immersive ubiquitous learning environment. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(4), 161–175.

    Google Scholar 

  • Markett, C., Sánchez, I. A., Weber, S., & Tangney, B. (2006). Using short message service to encourage interactivity in the classroom. Computers & Education, 46(3), 280–293.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Masuch, M., & Röber, N. (2004). Game graphics beyond realism: Then, now and tomorrow. In Level UP: Digital Games Research Conference. Faculty of Arts, University of Utrecht.

    Google Scholar 

  • Melero, J., & Hernández-Leo, D. (2014). A model for the design of puzzle-based games including virtual and physical objects. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 192–207.

    Google Scholar 

  • Okoli, C., & Schabram, K. (2010). A guide to conducting a systematic literature review of information systems research.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’malley, J. M., & Chamot, A. U. (1990). Learning strategies in second language acquisition. Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papastergiou, M. (2009). Digital game-based learning in high school computer science education: Impact on educational effectiveness and student motivation. Computers & Education, 52(1), 1–12.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pascoe, J., Ryan, N., & Morse, D. (2000). Using while moving: HCI issues in fieldwork environments. Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 7(3), 417–437.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Prasad, M. R., Gyani, J., & Murti, P. R. K. (2012). Mobile cloud computing: Implications and challenges. Journal of Information Engineering and Applications, 2(7), 7–15.

    Google Scholar 

  • Prensky, M. (2001). Fun, play and games: What makes games engaging. Digital Game-Based Learning, 1–05.

    Google Scholar 

  • Prensky, M. (2003). Digital game-based learning. Computers in entertainment (CIE), 1(1), 21–21.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Prensky, M. (2005). Computer games and learning: Digital game-based learning. In Handbook of computer game studies, pp. 97–122.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reeves, T. (1994). Evaluating what really matters in computer-based education (pp. 219–246). Computer education: New perspectives.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sánchez, J., & Olivares, R. (2011). Problem solving and collaboration using mobile serious games. Computers & Education, 57(3), 1943–1952.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sandberg J., Maris M., De Geus, K. (2011). Mobile English learning: An evidence based study with fifth graders. Computers & Education, 1334–1347.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schwabe, G., & Göth, C. (2005). Mobile learning with a mobile game: Design and motivational effects. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 21(3), 204–216.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Siek, K. A., Rogers, Y., & Connelly, K. H. (2005). Fat finger worries: How older and younger users physically interact with PDAs. In Human-computer interaction (pp. 267–280).

    Google Scholar 

  • Stenros, J., Paavilainen, J., & Mäyrä, F. (2009). The many faces of sociability and social play in games. In International MindTrek Conference: Everyday Life in the Ubiquitous Era (pp. 82–89).

    Google Scholar 

  • Su, C. H., & Cheng, C. H. (2013). 3D game-based learning system for improving learning achievement in software engineering curriculum. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 12(2), 1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sung, H. Y., & Hwang, G. J. (2013). A collaborative game-based learning approach to improving students’ learning performance in science courses. Computers & Education, 63, 43–51.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Susaeta, H., Jimenez, F., Nussbaum, M., Gajardo, I., Andreu, J. J., & Villalta, M. (2010). From MMORPG to a classroom multiplayer presential role playing game. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 13(3), 257–269.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tarng, W., Lu, N. Y., Shih, Y. S., & Liou, H. H. (2014). Design of a virtual ecological Pond for motion-sensing game-based learning. International Journal of Computer Science & Information Technology, 6(2), 21.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Tlili, A., Essalmi, F., & Jemni, M. (2015). A mobile educational game for teaching computer architecture. In Advanced learning technologies (pp. 161–163).

    Google Scholar 

  • Tlili, A., Essalmi, F. & Jemni. M. (2016). Design of educational games: The evolution from computers to mobile devices. In Mediterranean Conference on Information & Communication Technologies.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tüzün, H., Yılmaz-Soylu, M., Karakuş, T., İnal, Y., & Kızılkaya, G. (2009). The effects of computer games on primary school students’ achievement and motivation in geography learning. Computers & Education, 52(1), 68–77.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Väätäjä, H., Koponen, T., & Roto, V. (2009). Developing practical tools for user experience evaluation—A case from mobile news journalism. 240–247.

    Google Scholar 

  • Watson, W. R., Mong, C. J., & Harris, C. A. (2011). A case study of the in-class use of a video game for teaching high school history. Computers & Education, 56(2), 466–474.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wei, J., Ren, R., Juarez, E., & Pescador, F. (2014). A linux implementation of the energy-based fair queuing scheduling algorithm for battery-limited mobile systems. Consumer Electronics, Transactions on Education, 60(2), 267–275.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • West, D. M. (2013). Improving health care through mobile medical devices and sensors. In Brookings Institution Policy Report.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wong, L. H., Hsu, C. K., Sun, J., & Boticki, I. (2013). How flexible grouping affects the collaborative patterns in a mobile-assisted Chinese character learning game? Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 16(2), 174–187.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wu, H. K., Lee, S. W. Y., Chang, H. Y., & Liang, J. C. (2013). Current status, opportunities and challenges of augmented reality in education. Computers & Education, 62, 41–49.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Zualkernan, I. A. (2006). A framework and a methodology for developing authentic constructivist e-Learning environments. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 9(2), 198–212.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ahmed Tlili .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Tlili, A. et al. (2020). The Evolution of Educational Game Designs From Computers to Mobile Devices: A Comprehensive Review. In: Burgos, D. (eds) Radical Solutions and eLearning. Lecture Notes in Educational Technology. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-4952-6_6

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-4952-6_6

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-15-4951-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-15-4952-6

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)