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Teacher Professional Development, the Knowledge-Rich School Project and the Curriculum Design Coherence Model

Abstract

The chapter is about the Curriculum Design Coherence Model (CDC), an innovative curriculum design tool for use in the professional development of teachers in all education sectors. The theory of knowledge-that informs the Model’s design is explained. This is followed by a description of the Knowledge-Rich School project which is trialling the CDC Model. The Project’s findings show that the Model is an effective curriculum design method in teacher professional development. Insights into the Model’s strengths and limitations which have emerged from its application in the project and which have led to the Model’s ongoing refinement conclude the chapter.

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Fig. 1

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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the work and contributions of the members of Knowledge-Rich School Project: Dr Alexis Siteine, Dr Tauwehe Tamati, Dr Barbara Ormond, Dr Megan Lourie, Dr John Etty, Dr Richard Pountney, Di Swift, Jo Palmer, Jo Pavlovich, Sally Tibbles, Mary Cornish, Amber Lloyd, Sue Tee, Barbara McGowan, Mary Robinson, Ros Robertson, Charles Laing, Steffan Minton, Yvonne Lindsay, and Jonty Poward.

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Rata, E., McPhail, G. (2020). Teacher Professional Development, the Knowledge-Rich School Project and the Curriculum Design Coherence Model. In: Fox, J., Alexander, C., Aspland, T. (eds) Teacher Education in Globalised Times. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-4124-7_17

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