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Water Commoning: Testing the Bille River in Hamburg as a Space for Collaborative Experimentation

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Abstract

With our cities growing and becoming consolidated, open spaces designated as public space are under pressure. Parks, squares, waterfronts, but also environmentally valuable wastelands are increasingly suffering from being developed, privatized or commercialized. Therefore, in the past years, civil society movements have slowly started to evolve, reclaiming and appropriating not only spaces on land but also urban water spaces to transform them into places for new social and spatial practices. However, local authorities do not yet seem to be able to incorporate these bottom-up initiatives into their top-down planning strategies for the development of urban river spaces. By considering the neglected Bille River and its adjacent canals in the industrial neighborhood in the east of Hamburg as a “real-world laboratory”, as a social space on water, a testing ground for exploration and experimentation was set up in a cooperation between HafenCity University and a local non-profit association. The laboratory on site aims at empowering local actors and changing structural conditions at the level of the various local authorities who need to be involved in the planning and approval of activities. A collaborative process applying different tools of investigation, debate and experimentation was started to support community-based knowledge production and to initiate and generate new collective practices of water appropriation.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-15-3507-9_8
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Fig. 1

(Source © Own graphic based on research by Engel & Völkers Residential, Hamburg 2017)

Fig. 2

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 3

(Source © Jimmy Baikovicius)

Fig. 4

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 5

(Source © Floating Museum)

Fig. 6

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 7

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 8

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 9

(Source © Amelie Rost)

Fig. 10

(Source © Dagmar Pelger)

Fig. 11

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 12

(Source © Dagmar Pelger)

Fig. 13

(Source © Dagmar Pelger)

Fig. 14

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 15

(Source © Dagmar Pelger)

Fig. 16

(Source © Architecture and Landscape, HafenCity University)

Fig. 17

(Source © Architecture and Landscape, HafenCity University)

Fig. 18

(Source © Antje Stokman)

Fig. 19

(Source © Dagmar Pelger)

Fig. 20

(Source © Antje Stokman)

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank all students and collaborators for their valuable input, support and contributions.

Justine-Lu Adam, Ingo Böttcher, Lisa Brunnert, Amrita Burmeister, Franziska Dehm, Julius Detlefsen, Johanna Dorn, Kay Uwe Engelhardt, Julia Marie Englert, Julia Erdmann, Jana Etmann, Flora Fessler, Andreas Goertz, Konstantin Glodzinski, Sureija Gotzmann, Tomma Groth, Ulrich Hein-Wussow, Katharina Hetzeneder, Max Julian Hübener, Marie-Therese Jakoubek, Rolf Kellner, Julia Jost, Felix Korganow, Björge Köhler, Lisa Kosok, Claus Kriegs, Nina Manz, Finn Martens, Iulia Miclea, Julia Maja Momic, Paul-Edgar Montanari, Mehrdad Nourbakhsh, Kirsten Plöhn, Thomas von Rekowski, Marian Rudhart, Kai Schwarz, Alexandra Schubert, Hans-Martin Schweier, Kira Seyboth, Martin Sukale, Wolfgang Vocilka, Timo Volkmann, Thorsten Witte, Frauke Woermann, Adrianna Wyganowska.

Special thanks to our colleague Kathrin Wildner, who contributed extensively with her expertise and guidance on the topic of soundscapes.

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Correspondence to Antje Stokman .

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Stokman, A., Pelger, D., Rost, A., Halbrock, D. (2020). Water Commoning: Testing the Bille River in Hamburg as a Space for Collaborative Experimentation. In: Wang, F., Prominski, M. (eds) Water-Related Urbanization and Locality. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3507-9_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3507-9_8

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