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Future Paradigm: Creating a Nonkilling World

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Abstract

To invoke the future paradigm for a nonkilling world, different innovative concepts have been deliberated such as human dignity post-war studies, nonkilling, human consciousness and peace. It is highlighted that how ideological tenets such as capitalism, communism and perceived misconception based on religion faith and idiosyncrasies have often led to instability, violence and terror. It is suggested that ideologies need to be refined and redefined so that humanity can thrive positively to affirmative nonviolence and nonkilling for positive peace. The chapter proposes a department of peace to instil a constructive framework for schooling and education.

When individuals are cultivated, families become harmonious. When families are harmonious, states becomes orderly. And when states are orderly, there is peace in the world.

Confucius (Adolf, Antony, 2009, Peace: A World History, Chapter 3: Peace in the Ancient East: India, China and Japan, Polity Press, U.K.)

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Notes

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Correspondence to Katyayani Singh .

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Singh, K., Swarup, A. (2020). Future Paradigm: Creating a Nonkilling World. In: The Nonkilling Paradigm. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-1247-6_9

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