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Lenses on Mobility

  • Mark PegrumEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

We live in a world which is ever more mobile, permeated by intertwined physical and digital forms of mobility. But ironically, it is a world which in recent years has witnessed a backlash leading to growing political and cultural barriers to mobility, which are simultaneously barriers to global communication and collaboration.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia

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