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Engaging Forms of ASEAN Higher Education: Regionalism and Governance

  • Lorraine Pe SymacoEmail author
  • Meng Yew Tee
Chapter
  • 232 Downloads
Part of the Higher Education in Asia: Quality, Excellence and Governance book series (HEAQEG)

Abstract

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) regional bloc is home to more than 600 million people with an eclectic mix of cultures, histories, political structures, higher education (HE) systems and levels of economic progress. The “ASEAN way” of HE regionalism may reflect a rudimentary form of Type II multilevel governance, involving largely task-specific, intersecting memberships, and flexible, problem-solving jurisdictions. This form of regional governance has been used to work through the aforementioned eclectic complexities, focusing mostly on minimally depoliticized tasks to meet the functional goals of international education. These initiatives focus on tasks such as quality assurance and standardization, harmonization, sustainability, student and labour mobility, and international partnerships and exchange. Organizations, such as ASEAN+3, the SEAMEO-RIHED and the AUN, facilitate these task-specific and problem-solving initiatives while adhering to the ASEAN way of constructive engagement, consensus-building and non-interference in member states’ internal affairs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Zhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.University of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia

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