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Higher Education Governance in Vietnam: Statism Versus Institutional Autonomy

  • Thanh Nghi PhamEmail author
  • Kimberly Goyette
Chapter
  • 229 Downloads
Part of the Higher Education in Asia: Quality, Excellence and Governance book series (HEAQEG)

Abstract

Governance usually refers to the coordination of the activities of a social system. It relates to principles and norms of behaviour in relations between constituents. Traditionally, the governance of higher education (HE) has been conducted by hierarchical control in many countries, with the state at the top of the hierarchy. More recently, though, the governance of HE has adopted a more corporate model of coordination between state and non-state actors (Pham 2010). Despite a series of policy changes designed to move towards this model of cooperation, the governance of HE in Vietnam continues to cling far too much to the traditional hierarchical mould. The problem of how HE is governed at both the system and institutional levels can be defined by the fact that both state controls and market forces have decisive roles in the governance process. In the past, the HE system in Vietnam trained graduates only for a state-planned economy. Funds for HE came from the state, and the HE system was managed centrally; there was only top-down governance. In the multi-sectoral economy which resulted from the doimoi (renovation) policy implemented in 1986, the HE system serves not only the state sector but also non-state ones. In these circumstances, higher education institutions (HEIs) are ideally given more autonomy in governance. Although this market-renovation policy has been in place for 30 years, the state still has a strong power over HEIs. This chapter will analyse how this power has affected coordination between the state agency and HEIs in the governance process.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vietnam Academy of Social SciencesHanoiVietnam
  2. 2.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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