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Disaster Management in India and Characterization for Geohazards

  • B. K. MaheshwariEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Developments in Geotechnical Engineering book series (DGE)

Abstract

Lives and properties of many people across the world are at significant risk due to various disasters including Earthquakes, Landslides, Floods, Cyclones, Droughts, Tsunamis, Fire and Industrial Disasters. In the Year 2005, the Government of India enacted Disaster Management (DM) Act, accordingly, there is a paradigm shift, from relief-centric response to proactive prevention, mitigation and preparedness approach towards disasters. In this article, the present scenario of disaster management in India is discussed. For effective disaster mitigation and management, the sites need to be classified. For this, geotechnical engineering plays a crucial role. The severity of damage during a disaster such as an earthquake is much controlled by local geological and geotechnical characteristics. Thus, geotechnical characterization of sites is important and the same is discussed using field and laboratory tests. Some of the results from the author’s research group are presented.

Keywords

Disaster management Earthquakes Landslides Liquefaction Site characterization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Earthquake Engineering and Former Head, Centre of Excellence in Disaster Mitigation & ManagementIIT RoorkeeRoorkeeIndia

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