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Adaptive Consistent Dictionary Learning for Audio Declipping

  • Penglong Wu
  • Xia ZouEmail author
  • Meng Sun
  • Li Li
  • Xingyu Zhang
Conference paper
  • 173 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 568)

Abstract

Clipping is a common problem in audio processing. Clipping distortion can be solved by the recently proposed consistent Dictionary Learning (cDL), but the performance of restoration will decrease when the clipping degree is large. To improve the performance of cDL, a method based on adaptive threshold is proposed. In this method, the clipping degree is estimated automatically, and the factor of the clipping degree is adjusted according to the degree of clipping. Experiments show the superior performance of the proposed algorithm with respect to cDL on audio signal restoration.

Keywords

Audio declipping Dictionary learning Adaptive threshold Adaptive consistent dictionary learning 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Thanks are due to Mr. Zou for assistance with the experiments and to Mr. Sun for valuable discussion. This paper is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China (61471394) and The National Natural Foundation of Jiangsu Province for Excellent Young Scholars (BK20180080).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penglong Wu
    • 1
  • Xia Zou
    • 1
    Email author
  • Meng Sun
    • 1
  • Li Li
    • 1
  • Xingyu Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.Army EngineeringUniversity of PLANanjingChina

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