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The Australian Far-Right: An International Comparison of Fringe and Conventional Politics

  • Peter LentiniEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Arguing that the Australian far-right is comprised of fringe and institutional actors, violent and non-violent activists, this chapter discusses the electoral performance of far-right political parties, the importance of Odinism in Australia’s far-right (and globally) as well as right-wing extremist terrorism in Australia. These themes are examined through an internationally comparative political opportunity structure framework. The analysis demonstrates that, while far-right political parties have remained rather marginal, compared to many European countries, Australia has had an enormous impact on the development on Odinism, which is among the most significant faiths within far-right movements globally. Moreover, Australia’s political opportunity structures appear to be a factor in the comparatively low level of Australian right-wing extremist terrorism. The chapter concludes by highlighting that far-right institutional actors and the fringe subcultures are not always poles apart.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Politics and International Relations, Global Terrorism Research Centre (GTReC)Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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