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Text-to-Voice and Voice-to-Text Software Systems and Students with Disabilities: A Research Synthesis

Part of the Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies book series (SIST,volume 144)

Abstract

The use of text-to-voice and voice-to-text software systems is becoming more popular to aid students with disabilities in general education classrooms. These systems allow students with disabilities to access content and learn classroom material more effectively and efficiently. The software systems are a subset of systems that should be considered in smart universities and smart classrooms. They will allow instructors to better educate local and distant college students. In addition, college students are more technological than ever before and are demanding new and innovative ways to learn. This paper presents the results from a comprehensive literature search on text-to-voice and voice-to-text software systems. A total of 20 articles were located which included 4 position papers, a meta-analysis, and 15 research studies with students with disabilities. Articles ranged from 1995 to 2018 and included elementary to college-aged student and adults. Each paper that was located will be described and results and conclusions will be provided. Even though students with disabilities are not the majority of learners in our classes, by incorporating university-wide smart systems and technologies, we believe many of these students will also benefit. This paper also addresses the potential impact these software systems could have on the learning of students with disabilities and how this software could aid universities to a possible transformation from a traditional university into a smart one.

Keywords

  • Smart classroom
  • Students with disabilities
  • Text to voice
  • Voice to text
  • Software systems

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Correspondence to Jeffrey P. Bakken .

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Bakken, J.P., Uskov, V.L., Varidireddy, N. (2019). Text-to-Voice and Voice-to-Text Software Systems and Students with Disabilities: A Research Synthesis. In: Uskov, V., Howlett, R., Jain, L. (eds) Smart Education and e-Learning 2019. Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies, vol 144. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-8260-4_45

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