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Empowerment for Economic and Human Capital Development Through Education

  • Wendy Mei Tien YeeEmail author
  • Serina Rahman
Chapter

Abstract

Published literature has demonstrated the close relationship between human capital development and economic growth. As education has an important impact on human capital development, it thus also impacts economic growth. This chapter discusses different dimensions of education such as education for human capital development, people-centred education, global citizenship education, education for inclusive sustainable development as well as environmental education for community empowerment. It focuses on the “people-centric” and “people empowerment” types of education as well as discusses a model of inclusive sustainable development that has been implemented over a period of 10 years in fishing villages in Malaysia. Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) regional economic development and integration can only be truly effective and sustainable through education that empowers the grass-roots and marginalized communities with knowledge, skills and competencies at the local level.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CITraUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia
  2. 2.Regional Economic StudiesISEAS—Yusof Ishak InstituteSingaporeSingapore

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